For Students and Educators

Soil Science Australia has developed a National Inventory of Soil Science Teaching to provide information to students, support the on-going development of soil science educators, and to highlight and facilitate the need for professional development in soil science.

A searchable database of Australian soil science courses collated in the project is shown below. The methodology is described in the attached report. The full database (including mapping to CPSS and TEQSA requirements) is also available for download.

The funding support of the Australian Soils Network (ASN) is kindly acknowledged.

University Courses

Tertiary InstitutionLocationUnit Faculty/SchoolDegree/sYear Unit Name% Soil ScienceAspects of Soil Science CoveredLearning OutcomesCategory
Australian National UniversityACTANU College of Science (Fenner School of Environment and Society)Bachelor of Science, Bachelor Environment and SustainabilityYear 2ENVS2018 - Environmental Science Field School30-80%This course provides hands-on opportunities for you to apply your theoretical understanding to critical observation and measurement of biodiversity, biogeography, landscape ecology, soil-vegetation processes and sustainable land management. You will develop skills in describing soils and landforms, measuring vegetation patterns, identifying habitat features and detecting faunal associations. You will learn to appreciate how soils, landforms, vegetation and fauna should be considered holistically in research and decision-making.Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:
1. Collect a diversity of data that describe the biophysical attributes and processes of ecosystems.
2. Recognise and understand strengths and weaknesses of a range of field sampling techniques and survey designs.
3. Demonstrate a capacity to choose appropriate data collection methodology, design appropriate sampling strategies and communicate findings about ecosystem patterns, processes and resource management impacts.
Indirect
Australian National UniversityACTANU College of Science (Fenner School of Environment and Society)Bachelor of Science (Development Studies, Environmental Studies, Resource and Environmental Management, Environmental Science, Geography); Bachelor Environment and Sustainability (same majors as Bachelor of Science)Year 2ENVS2023 - Sustainable Agricultural Systems30-80%Examines sustainable food systems, mentions ecological processes involving soils and land management issues - soil conservation, restoration, rehabilitationUpon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:
1. Understand the application of key concepts in human ecology and natural resource management to agricultural farming systems, and communicate these to a range of audiences in effective written and oral form.
2. Understand key agricultural systems concepts and perspectives at regional, national and global scales.
3. Demonstrate the knowledge of complex agricultural systems using a range of frameworks and tools.
4. Collect, analyse, interpret and present land and soil resource data (including remotely sensed data and published literature) from a range of scales in the landscape to produce land use and land management suitability scenarios.
5. Describe constraints and opportunities for future sustainable agricultural systems.
Indirect
Central Queensland UniversityQLDBachelor of Environmental Science (Integrated Land and Water Management)Year 2ENVR12001 - Soil Science and Conservation>80%In this unit you will learn the origin of soils and how they are affected by geology, geography, climate, living organisms and time. You will develop soil classification and testing skills in the laboratory and in the field, and study the conservation, management and remediation of Australian soils.On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
1. Describe the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of soil
2. Describe and classify a range of soils.
3. Plan and conduct soil tests in the laboratory and field.
4. Discuss the major challenges for the sustainable management and remediation of Australian soils.
Direct
Central Queensland UniversityQLDBachelor of Environmental Science (Integrated Land and Water Management)Year 1AGRI11001- Soil and Irregation Management>80%This unit covers the fundamentals of soil and water systems, integrating the VET competency units 'Monitor and manage soils for production' and 'Managing water systems'. You will learn how soil properties affect crop growth; how management strategies can be applied to manage variable soil conditions; how to interpret soil analytical data and how to develop soil improvement programs.On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
1. Use soil testing information to describe different soil types.
2. Explain how soil properties determine production opportunities.
3. Develop, monitor and review soil amendment practices.
4. Determine the feasibility of using or upgrading irrigation systems.
5. Develop and evaluate an appropriate irrigation plan.
Direct
Charles Darwin UniversityNTBachelor of Engineering (Civil); Bachelor of Engineering Science (Civil)Year 3ENG311 - Geomechanics30-80%Geomechanics involves the study of the behavior of soil and rock. This unit addresses geomechanics as used in civil engineering practice. This unit covers the formation of natural soil deposits, engineering properties of soils, soil exploration, soil compaction and stabilisation, water in soil, stress distribution in soil, consolidation of soil and settlement of structures, shear strength of soil, shallow foundations, pile foundations, drilled caissons, lateral earth pressure, retaining structures, stability analysis of slopes.On successful completion of this subject, students will be able to:
1. Identify common rock-forming minerals and related rocks.
2. Classify soils based on laboratory test results.
3. Analyse the behaviour of rock and soil properties.
4. Analyse stresses in soil under various conditions.
5. Design various footing/retaining structures based on geotechnical requirements.
6. Determine how altering soil conditions can influence soil properties.
7. Select appropriate procedures for laboratory testing, and interpret the results in relation to the field practice.
8. Use effective communication methods to convey ideas and principles.
Indirect
Charles Darwin UniversityNTBachelor of Environmental ScienceYear 3ENV316 - Ecosystem Function: Field Studies in North Australia30-80%Ecosystem function by assessing landforms, soil and vegetation. Land management practices are also considered from a range of perspectives.On successful completion of this subject, students will be able to:
1. Document and measure interactions between landform, soil, vegetation and climate across an environmental gradient.
2. Discuss the implications of environmental gradients for land use and management.
3. Apply field techniques for assessing landform, soil and vegetation characteristics and investigate the use of computer aided technologies in the field
4. Demonstrate an understanding of scale and its impact on spatial pattern in the natural environments.
5. Engage in group work and reflect on techniques for working effectively and collaboratively in small groups.
6. Communicate ecological information effectively in oral and written formats
Indirect
Charles Darwin UniversityNTMaster of Environmental Management (MEM)Year 1
[masters]
ENV516 - Ecosystem Function: Field Studies in North Australia30-80%Ecosystem function by assessing landforms, soil and vegetation. Land management practices are also considered from a range of perspectives.On successful completion of this subject, students will be able to:
1. Document and measure interactions between landform, soil, vegetation and climate across an environmental gradient.
2. Recommend land use and management actions in relation to environmental gradients.
3. Select and apply field techniques for assessing landform, soil and vegetation characteristics and investigate the use of computer aided technologies in the field.
4. Apply the concepts of scale and its impact on spatial pattern in natural environments.
5. Engage in group work and describe techniques for working effectively and collaboratively in small groups.
6. Communicate ecological information effectively in oral and written formats
Indirect
Charles Sturt UniversityNSW - Wagga WaggaFaculty of Science (School of Agricultural and Wine Sciences)Bachelor of Horticulture; Bachelor of Agricultural Business Management; Bachelor of Agricultural ScienceYear 1PSC104 - Soil Science100%Composition of soils, properties of the soil solid fraction, soil formation and classification. Properties of the liquid fraction, soil aeration and soil temperature.
Soil chemical properties: nutrient supply, nutrient retention, introduction to fertilizer, salinity/sodicity and pH extremes
Upon successful completion of this subject, students should:
1. Be able to demonstrate an understanding of soil formation processes and their effect on the distribution of soils on the landscape.
2. Be able to demonstrate how to create and interpret soil maps, including basic soil classification.
3. Be able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge required to create soil profile descriptions and interpret profile descriptions for the purpose of identifying soil based restrictions to plant growth.
4. Be able to demonstrate how management can influence soil health and plant production.
5. Be able to demonstrate an understanding of the influencing factors contributing to nutrient supply from soils, the cause and effects of waterlogging, soil ph extremes and salinity/sodicity.
Direct
Charles Sturt UniversityNSW - Wagga WaggaFaculty of Science (School of Agricultural and Wine Sciences)Master of Sustainable Agriculture; Bachelor of Horticulture; Graduate Cerificatet & Graduate Diploma in Sustainable AgricultureYear 3PSC415 - Soil Management100%This subject will cover the following topics:
(a) Defining soil degradation problems;
(b) Understand the problems, causes and management of: structural decline, extremes of pH, salinity, nutrient decline, erosion and pollution;
(c) Principles of soil conservation;
(d) Principles of soil conservation;
(e) Total catchment and land management policy
Upon successful completion of this subject, students should:
1. Be able to demonstrate an understanding of the major causes of soil degradation and their management.
2. Be able to evaluate the quality, and implications, of scientific information relating to soil management issues
be able to formulate and test hypotheses relating to soil management issues.
3. Be able to create and justify management options to conserve or improve the soil resource.
Direct
Charles Sturt UniversityNSWFaculty of Science (School of Agricultural and Wine Sciences)Bachelor of Horticulture; Bachelor of Agricultural Business Management; Bachelor Agricultural Science; Bachelor of Viticulture; Bachelor of AgricultureYear 3PSC350 - Advanced Soil Management90%Ccontemporary issues, challenges and approaches in soil management soil quality; soil health and soil ecosystem services, soil management and surveying technologies (e.g. remote sensing)Upon successful completion of this subject, students should:
1. Be able to review the relevant literature and related professional sources in order to synthesize current thinking on the issues and challenges of sustainable soil management.
2. Be able to describe and evaluate leading edge techniques for soil management in a variety of land use systems.
3. Be able to describe contemporary soil survey and analysis techniques to audit soil characteristics as a requirement for effective land use planning, including impact assessment.
4. Be able to design soil management systems to meet the requirements of soil ecosystem services and landscape functions.
5. Be able to apply strategies for sustainable soil management within a selected land use/management context.
6. Be able to critically discuss concepts underpinning sustainable soil management.
Direct
Charles Sturt UniversityNSW - Albury-WodongaFaculty of Science (School of Agricultural and Wine Sciences)Bachelor of ViticultureYear 2GEO204 - Ecological and Envrionmental Soil Science100%This subject will cover the following topics: Australia's native soils, Australian landforms and their persistence through geologic time, the features of the Australian environment that affect the formation of natural soil systems, classification of natural soil and landscape systems, ecological applications of soil knowledge, environmental problems related to soils, soils and sustainabilityUpon successful completion of this subject, students should:
1. Be able to describe the main features of Australia's natural soil systems.
2. Be able to describe the major landform development processes affecting the Australian landscape.
3. Be able to describe the relationships between soil properties and native fauna and flora.
4. Be able to describe, explain and crtically evaluate solutions to some environmental problems related to soils.
5. Be able to discuss the role of soils in sustainability
Direct
Charles Sturt UniversityNSW - Albury-WodongaSchool of Agricultural and Wine SciencesBachelor of Horticulture; Bachelor of Agricultural Business Management; Bachelor of Agricultural Science; Bachelor of ViticultureIRR200 Principles of Irrigation30-80%Soil-Plant-Water-Atmosphere Relations: soil-plant-water relations, soil moisture measurement, crop water requirement, irrigation water requirement and irrigation scheduling
Waste and recycled water use, environmental impacts of irrigation
Upon successful completion of this subject, students should:
1. Be able to compute plant available soil water and interpret soil-water relations.
2. Be able to calculate water requirement of horticultural and broad acre crops.
3. Be able to apply basic hydraulic principles to determine pressure requirement and head loss in pipe and open channel flow systems.
4. Be able to explain the efficiency of a surface irrigation event and evaluate distribution uniformity of drip and sprinkler irrigation systems.
5. Be able to design a small scale pressurised irrigation system: choose appropriate dripper, sprinkler, and pump products.
6. Be able to assess irrigation water quality in terms of physical and chemical properties and determine the leaching requirements
Indirect
Charles Sturt UniversityNSW - Albury-WodongaMaster of Sustainable Agriculture Articulated SetIRR400 Principles of Irrigation30-80%Soil-Plant-Water-Atmosphere Relations: soil-plant-water relations, soil moisture measurement, crop water requirement, irrigation water requirement and irrigation scheduling
Waste and recycled water use, environmental impacts of irrigation
Upon successful completion of this subject, students should:
1. Be able to assess soil water status and deduce its availability to plants.
2. Be able to calculate crop water requirement and evaluate different approaches.
3. Be able to apply basic hydraulic principles to choose a pipe and open channel flow system which minimises pressure loss.
4. Be able to evaluate gravity and pressurised irrigation system using different performance indices.
5. Be able to design a small scale pressurised irrigation system: choose appropriate dripper, sprinkler, and pump products.
6. Be able to assess irrigation water quality in terms of physical and chemical properties and propose control/management methods
Indirect
Charles Sturt UniversityNSW - Albury-WodongaMaster of Sustainable Agriculture Articulated SetIRR401 Management of Irrigation Systems30-80%Irrigation Scheduling and Crop Response including: plant response to water, root zone water balance, climate based methods, soil based methods, plant based methods, deficit irrigation, partial root zone drying;
Drainage and Salinity: excess irrigation and groundwater table, methods of subsurface drainage, basic salt balance, methods of dealing with salt, leaching requirements, waste water and recycled water management for irrigation
Upon successful completion of this subject, students should:
1. Be able to appraise a range of methods available for soil water measurement and monitoring.
2. Be able to schedule irrigation system using different soil-based and plant-based approaches.
3. Be able to apply basic hydraulic principles in the design of pressurised and open channel flow systems.
4. Be able to evaluate the appropriateness of an irrigation system to a particular soil-crop-climate combination.
5. Be able to design pressurised and surface irrigation system and evaluate the performance.
Indirect
Curtin UniversityWAFaculty of Science and EngineeringMaster of Science (Dryland Agricultural Systems)PostgraduateAGRI5002 - Advanced Soil Systems100%This unit will evaluate the key aspects of soil biology, chemistry and physics that influence productive soil systems. Natural and induced processes that modify soil conditions in agricultural, horticultural and mine site environments will be explored. Methodologies used to improve soil conditions to restore or sustainably manage soils will be evaluated. Techniques to sample, analyse and interpret soil conditions will be investigated.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
Curtin UniversityWAFaculty of Science and EngineeringBachelor of Agribusiness; Bachelor of Science (Environmental Science)Year 2AGRI2006 - Soil Systems>80%This unit will evaluate the key aspects of soil biology, chemistry and physics that influence productive soil systems. Natural and induced processes that modify soil conditions in agricultural, horticultural and mine site environments will be explored. Methodologies used to improve soil conditions to restore or sustainably manage soils will be evaluated. Techniques to sample, analyse and interpret soil conditions will be investigated.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
Deakin UniversityVICYear 2SEV252- Geomechanics 1>80%Students will take a design-based approach that develops their understanding of soil physical properties, soil mechanical properties and geotechnical engineering associated with residential applications. Students will work according to Australian Standards to produce industry specific documentation and develop laboratory skills associated with soil testing.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
Deakin UniversityVICBachelor of Civil Engineering (Honours)Year 2SEV200 - Geotechnical Investigation and Design30-80%Soil classification, compaction and consolidation, seepage, stress distribution and settlement, and an introduction to foundation design.Deakin Graduate Learning Outcomes:
1. ULO1: Develop, implement and complete a project management strategy for evaluating and meeting stakeholder needs in provided timeframes, both individually and as a team.
2. ULO2: Explain and apply fundamental engineering concepts associated with engineering geology and soil mechanics.
3. ULO3: Undertake a team-based geotechnical investigation using laboratory and/or field tests abiding by Australian standards and applying fundamental geotechnical concepts to soil analysis and communicating the results to a professional audience.
4. ULO4: Analyse, develop, design, and professionally communicate geotechnical engineering solutions for given problems, meeting stakeholders’ requirements and Australian geotechnical standards.
Indirect
Edith Cowan UniversityWASchool of ScienceBachelor of Science (Environmental Management); Bachelor of Science (Marine and Freshwater Biology); Bachelor of SustainabilityBsust : Year 1, Sem 2
Bachelor of Science: Year 2, Sem 1
SCM2201 - Soil and Land ProcessesMajorityUnit Content
1. Applied soil ecology: ecosystem concepts as applied to soil communities; the contribution of the soil biota to soil structure, decomposition processes and nutrient cycling.
2. Hydrology and land management Pathways of water movement in soil. Aspects of hydrogeology relevant to land management and soil conservation. Principles of catchment hydrology and the land phase (surface and groundwater) of the hydrological cycle.
3. Land degradation processes - Overview of soil degradation processes and the influence of land use. Particular reference to wind and water erosion, degradation of soil structure, degradation of biological function, salinity and waterlogging, soil fertility and acidification and soil pollution.
4. Soil and landscape processes Relationships between geomorphology, soils and hydrology. Processes of landscape and soil development.
5. Soil properties - physical, chemical, biological properties and components of soil. Methods (field and laboratory) of soil sampling and description, analysis and classification. Techniques for soil surveying.
On completion of this unit students should be able to:
1. Identify soil and landscape processes, soil properties, and various forms of soil and landscape degradation.
2. Use discipline specific terms to describe the physical, chemical and biological properties of soil.
3. Test soils to assess the impact of various land-use practices.
Direct
Edith Cowan UniversityWASchool of Engineering (no faculties?)Bachelor of Engineering (Civil)Year 3, semester 1ENS3242 - Soil Mechanics and Foundation EngineeringMinimalBasic description of soils, clay minerals, soil phases, soil problems in civil engineering. Consolidation, compressibility of soils. Deep foundations, piles, drilled piers, well foundations. Effective stress principle, ground water fluctuations, soil capillarity. Index properties and soil classification. Lateral earth pressure, retaining structures. Shallow foundations, load-bearing capacity theories, raft foundation. Shear strength of soils. Site investigation, excavation techniques. Slopes and embankments. Soil compaction, ground improvement techniques, stresses in soil mass. Soil permeability, fluid flow through soils, granular filter design.On completion of this unit students should be able to:
1. Describe and evaluate the properties of soils that affect their ability to support themselves and any imposed loads.
2. Design simple foundation elements for varying soil conditions.
3. Identify the types of soils that can occur at construction sites.
4. Specify appropriate excavation and retaining methods for soils.
Indirect
Edith Cowan UniversityWASciencePostgraduateSCI5124 - Land Degradation and Management>80%Case studies in land rehabilitation and management.
Catchment and farm planning - catchment principles in land management; development of farm plans.
Hydrology and land management - soil water movement; hydrogeology; catchment hydrology; land phase of hydrological cycle.
Land capability - land capability assessment, techniques.
Land degradation processes - wind and water erosion; degradation of soil structure; salinity and waterlogging; soil fertility and acidification.
Methods of land rehabilitation - mechanical, vegetative, hydrological; long term and short term remediation, mitigation.
Soil and landscape processes - influence of geomorphology on soils and hydrology; landscape development.
Soil ecology - the soil biota; ecosystem processes in soils; human impacts on soil biological processes.
Soil properties - physical, chemical, biological; methods of soil sampling and description, analysis and classification; soil surveying.
Sustainable land use - principles of sustainable land use; Landcare ethic and practice; ecology of agricultural and pastoral systems; integration and retention of remnant biodiversity.
On completion of this unit students should be able to:
1. Deduce the physical and chemical properties of soil from basic soil tests and surveys.
2. Identify soil, landscape and catchment processes and how they influence land degradation and rehabilitation.
3. Identify various forms of soil and land degradation and assess the impact of various land-use practices.
4. Select and apply methods to arrest soil degradation and rehabilitate degraded land and catchments.
5. Use the principles of sustainable land use to conduct a land capability assessment.
Direct
Federation University AustraliaVICSchool of Health and Life SciencesBachelor of GeoscienceYear 2ENVGC2747 - SOIL SCIENCE>80%The nature of soil, its formation and classification; physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil; soil organic matter. Chemistry of the nutrients in soil including ion exchange, ion sorption, redox potential. Environmental impact of soil salinity, acidity and soil erosion and their management practices. Effect of human inputs and activities on soils including agrochemicals, agricultural and industrial wastes and pollutants.On completion of this unit students will be able to:
1. Describe the fundamental properties of soil and its composition.
2. Explain the role of physical, chemical and biological properties of soil in maintaining soil fertility.
3. Summarise the chemistry of essential plant nutrients including N, P, K, and trace metals.
4. Give selected examples of the biotransformation of plant nutrients.
5. Discuss environmental and resource issues relevant to soil including acidity, salinity, soil erosion,
chemical pollution, soil management practices and effects of human inputs to soil.
6. Use selected laboratory and field techniques to assess soil chemical and physical properties.
Direct
Federation University AustraliaVICSchool of Science, Engineering and Information TechnologyBachelor of GeoscienceYear 3SCGEO3112 - SOILS AND WEATHERING: REGOLITH SCIENCE>80%Understanding the regolith, including soils; Terminology of soils and regolith; Regolith materials and their genesis; Development of weathering profiles; Soil biology; Regolith, soils and hydrology; Regolith and its relationship to salinity; Application of regolith to environmental issues; Regolith-landform evolution; Regolith mapping; Mineral exploration in the regolith; Principles of geochemical exploration; Element dispersion during weathering; Regolith as sampling media (ferruginous materials, soils, calcrete etc); Regolith and climate change.Students completing this course should be able to:
1. Explain the terminology, concepts and principles of the regolith, the blanket of soil and weathered and transported material that overlies fresh rock.
2. Appraise the main elements of the relationship between the regolith and its parent rock.
3. Evaluate the aspects of regolith geology and soil science that have significance for the interpretation of geological history, for mineral exploration and for environmental investigations.
5. Identify the major types of regolith, including soil.
6. Document and interpret the characteristics of regolith, including soil.
7. Conduct regolith mapping in the field.
8. Employ understanding of regolith processes in mineral exploration and environmental management.
9. Apply knowledge of regolith processes to relevant research projects.
Direct
Griffith UniversityQLDESC School of Environment and ScienceBachelor of Environmental Science (Soil and water science)Year 33441ENV - Land Degradation and Catchment Management>80%Soil properties and processes, measuring nitrogen and phosphorus in soils, soil acidity, measuring nitrogen and phosphorus in soils, soil salinity, measuring soil carbon, carbon sequestration in soils, land application of organic wastes, soil compaction and density measurement, soil structure degradation, soil erosion, catchment hydrology and management, bauxite residue rehabilitation, measuring soil erosion in GUTSR, and mine-site degradation & erosion modelling.After successfully completing this course you should be able to:
1. Identify and measure chemical, physical, biological and mechanical properties of soils which affect the management of soil, land and catchment;
2. Identify the major processes causing degradation of Australian soils at plot, field and catchment levels.
3. Apply different management strategies for reducing soil erosion and land degradation.
4. Identify causes of mine site degradation and devise methods for its rehabilitation.
5. Identify issues and processes important in sustainable land and catchment management.
6. Recognize and deal with the degradation of water resources as an integral part of most land management practices.
7. Identify biophysical issues associated with industrial land degradation and use them in their rehabilitation process.
8. Identify the key issues important to soil carbon sequestration, soil health, and soil and food security.
Direct
Griffith UniversityQLD ENG School of Engineering and Built EnvironmentBachelor of Engineering(honours)(civil) / Bachelor of Environmental Science (Soil and water science)Year 32102ENG - Soil Mechanics>80%Fundamentals of soil behavior, including the effective stress concept, soil permeability, shear strength, and water flow through soil. Conduct laboratory examination of soil samples, interpret and analyse results of such geotechnical investigations, and develop skills to write comprehensive and concise reports.After successfully completing this course you should be able to:
1. Evaluate the effect of geologic processes on the origin and composition of soil.
2. Estimate the behaviour of soil under different stress conditions.
3. Safely apply laboratory, test and experimental procedures to determine the geotechnical properties of soil.
4. Apply your knowledge of soils to the systematic investigation, interpretation and analysis of soil behaviour on a prospective project.
5. Prepare a high quality engineering report of your investigations and feasibility study in relation to site and laboratory testing.
Direct
Griffith UniversityQLDESC School of Environment and ScienceMaster of Science (Food Security)Postgraduate7309NSC - Bioavailability and Pollutant Management in Agriculture30-80%This course will discuss the complex interplay of microbes in in the natural environment and their impact on soil nutrient cycling in agricultural and horticultural production systems.After successfully completing this course you should be able to:
1. Understand the significance and reasons behind the key factors and drivers that underpin the bioavailability and management of both plant essential nutrients and pollutants in the context of rapid urbanisation / industrialisation and food security globally.
2. Critically evaluate and interpret published soil-plant research and literature and, in particular, be able to critique the conclusions drawn in the literature regarding specific topics that underpin soil and food security in the context of climate change and urbanisation / industrialisation.
Indirect
James Cook UniversityQLDCollege of Sciences and EngineeringBachelor of Science (Earth Science)Year 3EA3207 - Soil Properties and Processes for Science100%Introduction to fundamentals ofsoil science. How it sustains life on earth, influence plant growth, water cycling. Soil formation, classification and mapping, chemistry and physics, biology, carbon and ntrient cycling. Learning Outcomes:
1. Awareness of soil science and its relationship with other pursuits.
2. Knowledge of key chemical, physical and biological soil properties and processes.
3. Skills in assessing soils.
4. Ability to retrieve, analyse, synthesize and evaluate information and convey ideas and arguments clearly and coherently through written and oral communication.
Direct
James Cook UniversityQLDCollege of Sciences and EngineeringBachelor of Environmental Practice (Land and Water Management Major)Year 2EA2007 - Soil Properties and Processes for Management>80%How soil properties and processes influence plant growth, water cycling and quality, and gaseous exchanges with the atmosphere. Topics covered include soil characteristics and formation, particularly in Australia; classification and mapping; soil components; physical properties; chemical properties; organisms and ecology; and nature and cycling of carbon and nutrients.Learning Outcomes:
1. Awareness of soil science and its relationship with other pursuits.
2. Knowledge of key chemical, physical and biological soil properties and processes.
3. Skills in assessing soils.
4. Ability to retrieve, analyse, synthesize and evaluate information and convey ideas and arguments clearly and coherently through written and oral communication.
Direct
James Cook UniversityQLDCollege of Sciences and EngineeringGraduate Certificate of SciencePostgraduateEA5017 - Soil Properties and Processes>80%How soil properties and processes influence plant growth, water cycling and quality, and gaseous exchanges with the atmosphere. Topics covered include soil characteristics and formation, particularly in Australia; classification and mapping; soil components; physical properties; chemical properties; organisms and ecology; and nature and cycling of carbon and nutrients.Learning Outcomes:
1. Awareness of soil science and its relationship with other pursuits.
2. Knowledge of key chemical, physical and biological soil properties and processes.
3. Skills in assessing soils.
4. Ability to retrieve, analyse, synthesize and evaluate information and convey ideas and arguments clearly and coherently through written and oral communication.
Direct
La Trobe UniversityVICCollege of Science, Health and Engineering - School of Engineering and Mathematical SciencesBachelor of Civil EngineeringYear 3CIV3SOM - SOIL MECHANICS80%This subject introduces students to the basic concepts of the mechanics of soils. It covers soil descriptions and classification, the fundamental multi-phase nature of soils and the phase relationships, elementary seepage problems and the effective stress concept, deformation and shear strength of soils. Laboratory techniques to measure these properties will also be studied.Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes:
1.Describe and classify soils based on their basic physical characteristics Includes EA stage 1 competencies: 1.6 Understanding of the scope, principles, norms, accountabilities and bounds of contemporary engineering practice in the engineering discipline; 2.2 Fluent application of engineering techniques, tools and resources.
2. Determine the basic physical characteristics of a soil continuum. Includes EA stage 1 competencies: 2.1 Application of established engineering methods to complex engineering problem solving.
3. Specify soil compaction criteria for field applications and identify suitable equipment for field compaction. Includes EA stage 1 competencies: 2.2 Fluent application of engineering techniques, tools and resources.
4. Understand the concept of effective stress in soil mechanics and determine stresses in soil from surface loads Includes EA stage 1 competencies: 2.1 Application of established engineering methods to complex engineering problem solving; 2.3 Application of systematic engineering synthesis and design processes.
5. Determine the permeability of soils using the results of both laboratory tests and in-situ tests conducted in the field and understand how 2D groundwater flows for a wide range of ground conditions. Includes EA stage 1 competencies: 1.1 Comprehensive, theory based understanding of the underpinning natural and physical sciences and the engineering fundamentals applicable to the engineering discipline; 1.2 Conceptual understanding of the, mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics, and computer and information sciences which underpin the engineering discipline.
6.Determine the mechanical properties which characterise the consolidation behaviour from laboratory testing and calculate ground settlements as a function of time due to consolidation Includes EA stage 1 competencies: 1.1 Comprehensive, theory based understanding of the underpinning natural and physical sciences and the engineering fundamentals applicable to the engineering discipline; 1.2 Conceptual understanding of the, mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics, and computer and information sciences which underpin the engineering discipline.
7. Understand the method of operation of standard laboratory shear testing apparatus (direct shear, triaxial) and derive strength properties of soil from these tests. Includes EA stage 1 competencies: 1.1 Comprehensive, theory based understanding of the underpinning natural and physical sciences and the engineering fundamentals applicable to the engineering discipline; 1.2 Conceptual understanding of the, mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics, and computer and information sciences which underpin the engineering discipline.
Direct
La Trobe UniversityVICCollege of Science, Health and Engineering - School of Life SciencesBachelor of Science (Environmental geoscience); Bachelor of Agricultural SciencesYear 2AGR2ILS - INTRODUCTION TO LAND AND SOIL MANAGEMENT90%Topics covered include, soil formation, soil classification, soil structure and soil nutrients are covered. The physical, chemical and biological processes in soils and landscapes are investigated. Important issues such as salinity, sodicity will also be discussed.Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes:
1. Understand and demonstrate a knowledge of soil properties and their relationship to the control of plant growth and performance.
2. Critique the significance and relevance of soil properties in agriculture and the environment.
3. Explain the development and variation of physical properties of soil across the landscape, and their relevance to plant growth and land use.
4. Apply knowledge of soil properties to classify soils in the landscape.
5. Compute basic mathematical calculations and prepare graphic presentations of soils data consistent with scientific standards.
6. Analyse the movement and storage of water in soil, and explain its the relevance to plant growth and agricultural.
7. Recognise the inputs and outputs of nutrient cycling and soil organic matter and explain how they relate to plant production and health of the environment.
Direct
La Trobe UniversityVICCollege of Science, Health and Engineering - School of Life SciencesBachelor of Science; Bachelor of Agricultural Sciences; Bachelor of Commerce/Bachelor of Agricultural Sciences; Bachelor of Laws/Bachelor of Science; Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Business; Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of ScienceYear 3AGR3LS - LAND AND SOIL MANAGEMENT100%Soil properties (physical, chemical, biological), nutrient recycling, carbon dynamics, sustainable land use, and management of degradation and contamination.Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes:
1. Analyze soil properties as affected by long-term lime application and relate to strategies for management of soil acidity to improve plant growth and nodulation of legume plants.
2. Work effectively as a team member to communicate scientific results in oral and written formats.
3. Explain the development and variation of soil properties and processes and critically review their management in farming systems/sustainable land use.
4. Generate and critically evaluate datasets and effectively communicate scientific results using tables and graphs.
Direct
La Trobe UniversityVICCollege of Science, Health and Engineering - School of Life SciencesBachelor of Science; Bachelor of Agricultural Sciences; Bachelor of Commerce/Bachelor of Agricultural Sciences; Bachelor of Laws/Bachelor of Science; Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Business; Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of ScienceYear 2SCI2ECO - ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS70%Explores soil origin, formation, description, classification, chemistry, carbon and organic matter, linked with ecosystems and agriculture.Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes:
1. Identify ecological concepts, including ecosystem components, interactive processes, nutrient cycling and energy flow.
2. Identify different ecosystems and develop techniques used for sampling and monitoring their health.
3. Describe the relationship between physicochemical parameters of soil and water and environmental health.
4. Evaluate and interpret physical, chemical and biological parameters of soil and water, for purposes of sound management of agro-ecological systems.
Indirect
La Trobe UniversityVICCollege of Science, Health and Engineering - School of Life SciencesBachelor of Business (Agribusiness)Year 2AGR2LMT - LAND MANAGEMENT60%Agricultural production systems, biological and environmental factors influencing soil and plant productivity, and the importance of good land management.Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes:
1. Explain the significance and relevance of soil and landscape management in agriculture.
2. Research, develop and describe a crop and/or pasture establishment program in a format suitable for a professional audience.
3. Demonstrate knowledge of and explain the implications of climate change on agricultural production systems.
4. Describe and explain agronomic practices of crops and pastures in both dryland and irrigated environments
Indirect
Monash UniversityVICFaculty of ScienceBachelor of Science(Earth Science); Bachelor of Science (Environmental Science); Bachelor of Science (Geographical Science); Bachelor of Science (Human Geography) Sem 1
Year 3
EAE3321 Soils and land management100%Field description and analysis of soils and regolith, soil and regolith formation, key threats to the soil resource, and identifying management and remediation strategies.On successful completion of this unit, you should be able to:
1. Exhibit a high level of skill in field description, identification and analysis of soils and regolith.
2. Assess the current explanations for landscape management problems through critical evaluation of the literature and field and laboratory data.
3. Discuss the processes that lead to soil and regolith formation.
4. Discuss the key threats to the soil resource and identify management and remediation strategies.
5. Describe soil and land management issues in the context of both longer-term environmental change and current environmental change.
Direct
Monash UniversityVICFaculty of EngineeringBachelor of Engineering (Civil Engineering); Bachelor of Engineering (Geological Engineering); Bachelor of Engineering (Mining Engineering); Bachelor of Engineering (Oil and Gas Engineering); Bachelor of Engineering (Renewable Energy Engineering); + Honours in any of the aboveSem 1
Year 3
CIV3248 Groundwater and environmental geomechanics>80%Overview of concepts relating to groundwater resources and seepage, with emphasis on seepage containment in reservoirs, ponds, soil pollution and its avoidance, focusing on soil behaviour and its effect on seepage, groundwater percolation and migration of contaminant in the nearfield of waste containment facilities. Focus will also be on the function, design and construction of engineered soil barriers to prevent leakage from water reservoirs, ponds or to isolate different types of waste.On successful completion of this unit, you should be able to:
1. Give an engineering classification of soils, and on this basis predict how it will perform as an engineering lining material for waste containment facilities.
2. Calculate quantities of water flowing through the ground, and understand the effects that water flow has on the soil.
3. Identify the common situations when the soil becomes a factor in an engineering problem.
4. Explain the advantages and limitations of the different methods of seepage calculation.
5. Characterise contaminant migration through porous media.
6. Provide solutions to seepage problems based on the use of geosynthetics.
7. Use numerical and analytical procedures to analyse a geoenvironmental design problem.
Direct
Monash UniversityVICFaculty of ScienceBachelor of Science (Earth Science)Sem 2
year 2
EAE2322 Environmental earth science50%Soil formation processes, field description of soils and interlinking with ecosystems.On successful completion of this unit you should be able to:
1. Identify the biotic and abiotic processes which support the development of Earth's biosphere and lead to the formation of soils and sediments, and how they interact to influence water quality and vegetation.
2. Demonstrate practical, hands-on experience in field description and laboratory analysis of vegetation, water quality sediments and soils.
3. Identify key soil- and sediment-forming materials and processes.
4. Explain the role of plants, vegetation and microorganisms in ecosystem functioning.
5. Analyse interactions between Australia's unique soils, water and vegetation and to apply this knowledge to the future conservation and management of these resources.
Indirect
Monash UniversityVICFaculty of EngineeringBachelor of Engineering (Civil Engineering); Bachelor of Engineering (Geological Engineering); Bachelor of Engineering (Mining Engineering); Bachelor of Engineering (Oil and Gas Engineering); Bachelor of Engineering (Renewable Energy Engineering); + Honours in any of the aboveSem 2
year 2
CIV2242 Geomechanics 130-80%Soils in relation to engineering, soil properties, classification, soil physics. It also includes effective stress theory, stresses in a soil mass and shear strength.The learning outcomes associated with this unit are to:
1. Use knowledge of basic engineering geology in designing civil infrastructure on soils/rocks.
2. Plan and interpret results of geotechnical site investigations.
3. Classify soils and rocks including mineralogical compositions.
4. Identify different phases in soils and determine their densities, void ratios, porosities.
5. Determine total, effective and pore water pressures in soils/rocks including implications of loading on drainage behaviour of soils/rocks.
6. Identify and determine appropriate shear strength parameters of soils/rocks for engineering design.
7. Estimate incremental stresses in soils/rocks due to applied loads.
8. Use knowledge of soils/rocks in designing simple foundations.
Indirect
Murdoch UniversityWASchool of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Bachelor of Science (Crop and Pasture Science); Bachelor of Science (Environmental Science); Bachelor of Engineering (Environmental Engineering (Honours)); Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (Earth & Environmental Science Major teaching Area) - as of 2019Year 2, sem 1ENV243 - Water and Earth Science<30%Materials and processes in landscapes including rocks, regolith and soils; and the storage and movement of water within them.On successful completion of the unit you should be able to:
1. Recognize key geological and geomorphological features and processes.
2. Recognize key soil properties, and describe their significance for plant growth.
3. Explain the principles of hydrology and the management of water in natural and managed systems.
Indirect
Queensland University of TechnologyQLDFaculty of Science and EngineeringBachelor of Science (Earth Science, Environmental science)Year 3EVB312 - Soils and the Environment90%The unit covers the following topics in both a theoretical and an applied manner:
1. Theoretical and practical pedological concepts and soil profile processes.
2. Theoretical knowledge, analytical and critical thinking concerning pedogenesis: soil forming and development processes as dynamic systems.
3. Theoretical and practical knowledge and skills, and analytical thinking concerning soil materials - processes, composition, morphology, classification, and resource qualities.
4. Theoretical and practical knowledge of soil biological, chemical and physical processes & elemental cycles.
5. Theoretical knowledge of soil-plant interaction processes.
6. Technological concepts and effective problem-solving through soil survey, sampling and interpretation with group work
On completion of this unit you will be able to:
1. Apply your knowledge of soil science principles, and soil processes to solve problems in modern environments in the context of sustainable environmental management, plant production and hazard management.
2. Discuss how soils science principles are applied by professionals in the scientific investigation and sustainable ecosystem management.
3. Recognise, describe and classify soils and soil materials in the field and in the laboratory.
4. Interpret soil types, systems and processes from a range of data and information, and extract, analyse and present relevant data from soils for scientific purposes.
Direct
RMIT UniversityVIC171H School of ScienceBachelor of Environmental Science/Bachelor of Engineering (Environmental Engineering) (Honours)Year 2ENVI1012 - The Soil Environment>80%How soils form and recognise and describe Australian soils, the physics and biology of soil systems, the interconnections between soil health and critical global issues such as climate change and food security.On successful completion of this course you will be able to:
1. CLO 1 understand how soils form and recognise and describe Australian soils.
2. CLO 2 understand the physics and biology of soil systems.
3. CLO 3 recognise how management can affect soil and be able to apply concepts of land capability to environmental problems.
4. CLO 4 describe the interconnections between soil health and critical global issues such as climate change and food security.
5. CLO 5 communicate convincingly about soils to a range of audiences in written and oral format.
Direct
RMIT UniversityVIC120H Civil, Environmental & Chemical EngineeringBachelor of Environmental Science/Bachelor of Engineering (Environmental Engineering) (Honours)Year 4OENG1039 - Land Contamination and Remediation>80%Geochemistry, soil and groundwater assessment methods and basic environmental and health risk assessment.On completion of this course you should be able to:
1. Interpret and communicate information on the contamination of soil and groundwater and its significance.
2. Interpret environmental contamination problems in both the regional and local hydrogeological context, and evaluate impacts on groundwater quality, soil quality, amenity and potential future land uses.
3. Explain the terminology and describe the methodology of environmental contamination management, monitoring, auditing, remediation and clean up validation.
4. Explain and implement sound engineering design principles for waste disposal and other potentially hazardous sites, such as landfills.
Direct
RMIT UniversityVIC172H School of EngineeringBachelor of Environmental Science/Bachelor of Engineering (Environmental Engineering) (Honours)Year 5CIVE1178 - Geotechnical Engineering 1>80%Geotechnical engineering deals with the behaviour of soils under the influence of loading from structures. It uses the concepts of soil and rock mechanics to model real world engineering problems, aided by empirical observations and a systematic classification of soil materials which seeks to correlate classification and physical properties with engineering behaviour.On completion of this course you should be able to:
1. Define geotechnical engineering, determine soil physical characteristics (including unit weight / density - water content relationship), classify soils and describe field compaction methods and related quality control.
2. Determine the coefficient of permeability and equivalent hydraulic conductivity in stratified soil (according to established scientific principles for the flow of water through saturated soils) and calculate seepage, pore water pressure distribution, uplift forces and seepage stresses for simple geotechnical systems.
3. Describe the purposes and different phases of a soil investigation, soil exploration program, soil exploration methods and soil identification in the field.
4. Discuss the concept of effective stress and determine stress distribution within a soil mass.
5. Explain the ‘shear strength’ of soil, describe the direct shear test method and interpret direct shear test results.
6. Calculate the bearing capacity of shallow foundations and factor of safety.
Direct
RMIT UniversityVIC171H School of ScienceBachelor of Environmental Science/Bachelor of Engineering (Environmental Engineering) (Honours)Year 4CHEM1085 - Environmental Chemistry 3A30-80%Structure and Function of Clay Minerals and Organic Matter in the Soil. Soil pH and soil acidity. Cation Exchange Capacity and its importance in soil chemistry. The cycles of the main nutrients in soil: nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sulphur.Sources, ecological impacts and distribution of Soil Pollutants. Pesticides in the soil environment. Treatemnt and disposal of solid and liquid wastes. Environmental chemistry of processes in landfills and the impact these processes have on groundwaters.On successful completion of this course you should be able to:
1. Demonstrate a broad and coherent knowledge and understanding of aquatic chemistry and of soil chemistry.
2. Gather, synthesize and critically evaluate information from a range of sources.
3. Collect, record, interpret and draw conclusions from scientific data.
4. Communicate effectively results, information or arguments in aquatic and soil chemistry, in writing.
5. Be an independent and self-directed learner.
6. Work effectively, responsibly, ethically and safely in an individual or team context.
Indirect
Southern Cross UniversityNSWSchool of Environment, Science and EngineeringAssociate Degree of Science; Bachelor of Environmental Science; Bachelor of Forest Science and Management; Bachelor of Science; Bachelor of Environmental Science/Bachelor of Marine Science and Management; Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) in Coastal Systems EngineeringYear 2AGR00214 - Soil Processes100%Soil formation, physics, chemistry, soil water, organic matter, clay mineralogy, nutrition, classificaiton, biologyLearning Outcomes:
1. Describe the main soil forming processes.
2. Describe the role of organic matter and clay minerals in soil processes and properties.
3. Discuss the role of the major soil nutrients in plant nutrition and outline the main plant nutrient cycles.
4. Assess soil structure, texture and consistence in the field sufficient to enable soil classification.
5. Demonstrate soil surveying technique.
6. Discuss the use of soil classification systems in general and understand the features of a range of soil classification systems as well as classify soils according to two major Australian soil classification systems.
7. Describe some important soil chemical and physical processes and properties.
Direct
Southern Cross UniversityNSWSchool of Environment, Science and EngineeringYear 3AGR03072 Soil Processes>80%(a) Soil and its constituents
(b) Soil physical properties: texture, structure
(c) Soil water
(d) Soil organic matter
(e) Soil and clay mineralogy
(f) Soil and plant nutrition: nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sulphur and trace elements
(g) Soil formation
(h) Soil classification
(i) Soil biology
Learning Outcomes:
1. Describe the main soil forming processes.
2. Describe the role of organic matter and clay minerals in soil processes and properties.
3. Discuss the role of the major soil nutrients in plant nutrition and outline the main plant nutrient cycles.
4. Assess soil structure, texture and consistence in the field sufficient to enable soil classification.
5. Demonstrate soil surveying technique.
6. Discuss the use of soil classification systems in general and understand the features of a range of soil classification systems as well as classify soils according to two major Australian soil classification systems with interpretation of their limitations.
7. Describe some important soil chemical and physical processes and properties and discuss their implications for management.
Direct
Southern Cross UniversityNSWSchool of Environment, Science and EngineeringBachelor of Environmental Science; Bachelor of Forest Science and Management; Bachelor of Science; Bachelor of Environmental Science/Bachelor of Marine Science and management; Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) in Coastal Systems EngineeringYear 2AGT00217 - Land Degradation and Rehabilitation80%Soil degradation, acidification, movement, water repellance, biological degradation.Learning Outcomes:
1. Identify and discuss the causes, prevention and rehabilitation of a range of types of land degradation.
2. Classify land according to a land capability classification system.
3. Explain the principles and practices of soil conservation structure design.
4. Critically analyse a selected land use or land management issue in relation to its land degradation potential and recommend prevention and rehabilitation strategies.
Direct
Southern Cross UniversityNSWSchool of Environment, Science and EngineeringMaster of Forest Science and ManagementYear 2AGT03090 Land Degradation and Rehabilitation>80%(a) Erosion by water
(b) Soil erosion by wind
(c) Soil structural degradation
(d) Soil acidification
(e) Water repellence by soil
(f) Salinisation
(g) Land capability classification
(h) Soil conservation structure design
(i) Acid sulfate soils and their management
(j) Mass movement
Learning Outcomes:
1. Identify and discuss the causes, prevention and rehabilitation of a range of types of land degradation.
2. Classify land according to a land capability classification system and critically analyse that classification.
3. Explain the principles and practices of soil conservation structure design.
4. Critically analyse a selected land use or land management issue in relation to its land degradation potential, recommended prevention and rehabilitation strategies and its social, political and economic implications.
Direct
Southern Cross UniversityNSWSchool of Environment, Science and EngineeringAssociate Degree of Civil Construction (Engineering and Management); Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) in Coastal Systems Engineering; Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) in Civil Engineering; Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) in Mechanical EngineeringYear 2ENG30002 Soil Mechanics and Geology>80%(a) Composition and particle sizes of the soil
(b) Phase relationship, physical states and soil classification
(c) Determination of liquid limit, plastic limit and linear shrinkage
(d) Flow of water in the soil and soil hydraulic conductivity
(e) Soil compaction
(f) Surface load stresses and principle of effective stress
(g) Soil settlement
(h) Soil strength
Learning Outcomes:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the geological and engineering properties of soils.
2. Perform laboratory tests on soil samples to the Australian Standards to determine properties required in analysis and understand the need for accreditation of soil laboratories.
3. Demonstrate proficiency in applying analytical methods to determine stresses and strains in soils under load.
4. Demonstrate understanding of the movement of water in soils.
Direct
Southern Cross UniversityNSWSchool of Environment, Science and EngineeringDiploma of Civil Construction (Engineering and Management); Associate Degree of Civil Construction (Engineering and Management); Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) in Coastal Systems Engineering; Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) in Civil Engineering; Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) in Mechanical EngineeringYear 2ENG61004 Construction Materials - Soils30-80%(a) Soil types and classification
(b) Phase (weight-volume) relationships
(c) Soil stabilisation techniques
(d) Subsoil exploration
(e) Principles of earthworks construction
Learning Outcomes:
1. Describe the basic physical and mechanical properties of wet and dry soil and determine these properties using standard laboratory methods.
2. Apply the principles of soil stabilisation.
3. Apply the principles of earthworks construction.
4. Describe the fundamentals of subsurface exploration
Indirect
Swinburne UniversityVICFaculty of Science, Engineering and TechnologyBachelor of Engineeing (Civil); Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) / Bachelor of Science(Environmental Science)Year 2CVE20004 -Geomechanics30-80%Engineering Properties and Classification of Soils (20%): Definition of Soil (Clay, Silt, Sand, Gravel, Cobbles and Boulders) as per Australian Standard; Structure of Soil by Phase Relationships, including Weight – Volume Relationships, Water Content, Void Ratio, Porosity, Degree of Saturation, and Specific Gravity; Mechanical Analysis of Soil (particle size determination) and classification of coarse-grained soils; Consistency of fine grained soils by index tests and classification of fine grained soils; Overall Soil Classification in accordance with Australian Standard: AS1726-1993;
Soil Hydraulics (10%): Water flow through soils, including the Bernoulli's principle and the determination of soil permeability coefficients from field and laboratory methods; Basic flow net analysis;
Geostatic Stresses and the Shear Strength of Soil (30%): Effective Stress Law (Total Stress, Effective Stress and Pore Pressures); Stresses in a Soil Mass – caused by point loads and loaded areas; Normal and Shear Stress on a Plane: Pole Method and Mohr-Coulomb Failure Criteria. Laboratory and Field Tests to Determine Shear Strength of Soils: Direct Shear Test, Unconsolidated Undrained Triaxial Test, Consolidated Drained Triaxial Test
• Consolidated Undrained Triaxial Test, Unconfined Compression Test, Vane Shear Test and Penetrometer Tests

Compressibility of Soils (20%)
• Immediate Settlement based on Elastic Theory
• Consolidation Theory and One-Dimensional Consolidation Test
• Consolidation Settlement, Time Rate of Consolidation and Coefficient of Consolidation
Students who successfully complete this unit will be able to:
1. Interpret the geological rock cycle and be able to identify common rock forming minerals, basic types of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks.
2. Determine physical engineering properties of sediments (soils) and apply these quantities to phase relationships and the soil model.
3. Perform a mechanical (sieve) analysis and a series of soil index tests on a soil in order to determine its particle size distribution plot and Atterberg limits according to Australian Standard AS1289. Thus, enabling classification of the soil via Australian Standard AS1726.
4. Appreciate the basic concepts of water flow through soil in order to construct simple flow nets and estimate relevant discharge calculations for various ground structures.
5. Clearly understand the effective stress concept in soils by calculating total stresses, effective stresses and pore pressures for various ground conditions.
6. Determine changes in soil stresses due to external point loads, line loads, loaded areas, uniform and non-uniform strip loads using elastic theory, and soil strength parameters from a range of physical field and/or laboratory test.
7. Estimate immediate and consolidation settlements from various external loading combinations.
Indirect
The University of AdelaideSAFaculty of Sciences, School of Agriculture, Food and WineBachelor of Agricultural Sciences, Bachelor of Viticulture and OenologyYear 1SOIL&WAT 1000WT - Soils and Landscapes I100%The importance of soils in the landscape in relation to management of fertility, water use efficiency, and land degradation. Land management and soils within agricultural systems. Soil properties- physical, chemical, biological and soil sampling.On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
1. Understand and explain basic principles underlying the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils in landscapes.
2. Quantitatively assess and interpret soil characteristics from the landscape to the sub-paddock scale using relevant technologies, including satellite imagery on the landscape scale and emerging digital technologies (precision agriculture) on the sub-paddock scale.
3. Undertake (individually, in pairs or groups) simple field sampling of soil and laboratory measurements of basic soil physical and chemical properties proficiently.
4. Give a basic description of a soil profile and broadly assign this within the Australian Soil Classification system.
5. Search and find (individually and within a team) relevant scientific and technical information in the context of management of soils for different agro ecosystems.
6. Critically evaluate and confidently interpret soils data, maps and information especially in relation to identifying potential management issues for agro ecosystems and suggesting potential solutions. This relates to a range of scales, from landscape (e.g. land capability assessment) to sub-paddock (e.g. precision agriculture).
7. Communicate effectively to individuals and in groups (orally and written) concerning the application of soil science in agro ecosystem landscape management.
8. Integrate elements of knowledge and work to a deadline.
Direct
The University of AdelaideSAFaculty of Sciences, School of Agriculture, Food and WineBachelor of agricultural sciences, Bachelor of Science (Soil Science); Honours Degree of Bachelor of Environmental Policy and Management; Bachelor of Viticulture and OenologyYear 2SOIL&WAT 2500WT - Soil and Water Resources II100%Soil physical, chemical and biological properties, soil water retention, storage and movement, salinity, chemical fertility, the role of biology in soil processes, and soil conservation and management.On successful completion of this course students should be able to:
1. Understand and answer written questions about physical, chemical and biological soil properties, nutrient cycles and the role of soil organisms in these, and important water quality indicators.
2. Conduct basic measurements & observations of soil properties / behaviour, describe the nature and extent of soil degradation in Australia and suggest approaches to manage and conserve soils.
3. Improve their quantitative problem-solving skills, including data handling.
4. Work effectively in small groups
Direct
The University of AdelaideSAFaculty of Sciences, School of Agriculture, Food and WineBachelor of Science (Soil Science) Year 3SOIL&WAT 3017WT - Soil & Water: Management & Conservation III80%Soil and water conservation, processes that degrade the soil and water resources of Australia (e.g. erosion, salinity, alkalinity and sodicity, as well as acidification, water repellence, and degradation of soil structure) are examined, and their measurement, avoidance and management discussed.Successful students will learn:
1. Theory & measurement of soil water content, movement, storage & plant availability.
2. How to manage and measure salinity and sodicity in irrigated agricultural systems.
3. How to solve quantitative problems in soil water management, specifically how to: conduct simple calculations of water content, porosity, density and hydraulic conductivity; Analyse and interpret data on infiltration, available water, and storage of water.
4. How to work effectively in small groups in the lab and in the field.
5. The primary causes and consequences of a wide range of soil degradation problems, including soil acidity and alkalinity, erosion, salinity and sodicity, and nutrient loss.
6. The impact of soil management on soil organic matter, soil structural stability, water quality and other important soil properties.
7. Where soil conservation and management fit into the broader context of the South Australian Natural Resource Management Act.
8. Develop an ability to collect and evaluate data in practical classes.
9. Develop writing skills through essay and report writing.
10. Learn how to provide and respond to “peer-review” feedback on a draft essay.
Direct
The University of AdelaideSASchool of Civil, Environmental & Mining EngBachelor of Engineering (Honours) (Civil, Structural & Environmental)Year 2C&ENVENG 2069 - Geotechnical Engineering II30-80%The course provides an understanding of: the nature of soils and their variability; and the state and behaviour of a soil. Topics include:
The Origin and Composition of Soils: introduction to geotechnical engineering, processes that form soils, clay mineralogy; phase relationships, Atterberg limits and soil classification: soil state definitions, phase relationships, grain size analyses, Atterberg limits, soil classification and description; vertical stress in soils: soil suction, total vertical stress, pore water pressure, effective vertical stress; flow of water through soils: water flow, permeability, 2D seepage and measurement; consolidation: introduction to consolidation theory, oedometer test, overconsolidation ratio, consolidation settlement, time rate effects, sand drains; strength of soils: shear strength of sands and clays, Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion, direct shear test, triaxial test, soil improvement: compaction - concepts, measurement and field techniques, overview of other soil improvement techniques.
On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
1. Apply geotechnical engineering and soil mechanics in the broader discipline of civil engineering.
2. Explain the different types of soil and their engineering properties.
3. Demonstrate an awareness of soil description.
4. Explain soil compaction and ground improvement.
5. Examine the concept of effective stress and its influence on soil behaviour.
6. Explain the influence of water flow on the engineering behaviour of soils
7. Explain the compressibility of soils and the concept of consolidation.
8. Examine soil shear strength.
9. Interpret and use experimental data.
10. Demonstrated ability to report the results of a laboratory experiment at a professional standard.
Indirect
The University of AdelaideSAFaculty of Sciences, School of Agriculture, Food and WineBachelor of Science (Soil Science) Year 3PLANT SC 3505WT - Soil and Plant Nutrition III50%Soil and plant analysis, nutrient cycling, relationship between soils and plant health.On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
1. Acquire knowledge and understanding of the chemical processes in soils that influence mineral nutrient availability.
2. Develop an understanding of how mineral nutrients are taken up by plants, transported and assimilated by plants.
3. Develop an understanding of how mineral nutrients interact with important abiotic and biotic stresses.
4. Understand the role of mineral nutrients in the quality of the harvested product.
5. Develop an understanding of how the nutrient status of plants is diagnosed by soil and plant analysis and the strengths and weaknesses of different methods
6. Acquire knowledge of the importance of fertiliser formulation to soil nutrient availability
7. To develop skills in sampling soil and plant tissues for routine analysis and diagnosis of nutrient status
8. Develop skills in interpreting the results of soil and plant analyses.
9. Develop a critical approach to data analysis and interpretation.
10. Promote the ability to work co-operatively as a member of a group.
Indirect
The University of AdelaideSAFaculty of Sciences, School of Agriculture, Food and WineBachelor of Science (Soil Science) Year 3SOIL&WAT 3016WT - Soil Ecology and Nutrient Cycling III80%Ecological interactions in soils, nutrient cycling, and soil biology.On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
1. Participants in this course will be given an awareness of the importance of nutrient cycling in agricultural and natural ecosystems, the factors affecting nutrient availability and how management will affect nutrient cycling.
2. Students will acquire practical knowledge about common analyses methods to assess nutrient cycling including microbial activity and N and P availability in soils.
3. Students will be able to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources for an in-depth and critical discussion of their practical reports and a research proposal in the field of nutrient cycling in a planned and timely manner.
4. Students will demonstrate the ability to communicate in written form.
5. Acquire awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues related to nutrient cycling in Australia and within a global context.
Direct
The University of MelbourneVICScienceMaster of Science (Conservation and restoration, Environmental Science); Master of Environment (Environmental Science, integrated water catchment management); Master of Urban HorticulturePostgraduateAGRI90066 - Soil Science and Management80%This subject will examine the major current issues in the management of soils under various land uses in Australia. The dynamic nature of soils will be explored through study of the chemical, physical and biological processes in the soil environment, particularly those which impact directly on plant growth. The subject should develop an understanding of how soils can be managed to optimise plant growth and minimise adverse effects on the environment and present practical solutions to soil management.Intended learning outcomes:
1. Recognise the major issues affecting the sustainable management of soils under various land uses in Australia.
2. Appreciate the dynamic nature of soils and apply practical solutions to soil management problems.
3. Understand the physical, chemical and biological processes that control nutrient and contaminant availability in soils.
4. Understand the role of soil/agriculture in mitigation greenhouse gas emissions.
5. Be familiar with the principles underlying the analysis of soils and plants for assessing soil nutrient availability.
6. Understand the principles used in soil survey and conduct a basic land capability assessment.
Direct
The University of MelbourneVICScienceMaster of Urban Horticulture; Master of Environment (Sustainable cities, sustainable regions)PostgraduateERTH90028 - Urban Soils, Substrates and Water60%Urban soils can present distinct and unique challenges to the land manager, landscape architect or horticulturist responsible for developing, maintaining or improving urban landscapes. Often compacted, contaminated, or otherwise unsuitable for plant growth, urban soils require assessment, solutions and practical methods to ensure successful outcomes. This applications-oriented subject covers several fundamental soil science issues with direct relevance to urban landscape impacts, uses and requirements. Topics covered include compaction, nutrition, contamination, water supply, drainage and structural soils.Intended learning outcomes:
1. Discuss ecosystem services that urban soils provide to the population, built landscape and biodiversity.
2. Discuss key soil physical and chemical properties and their application to urban soil typologies.
3. Undertake field assessments/measurement of soil properties (physical, hydrologic & chemical), including sampling of urban soils for laboratory analysis.
4. Discuss the mechanisms that impact urban soil conditions.
5. Describe the rationale, function, design and installation of structural soils, containerised soils and other specialised environments.
6. Assess methods used to remediate, alleviate and improve urban soils.
7. Investigate case studies of soil assessment, analysis and problem solving in different urban landscape scenarios (turf, tree, construction, horticultural, roads, etc.).
8. Discuss hydrological issues associated with soil water availability, irrigation supply and drainage management.
Direct
The University of MelbourneVICScienceBachelor of AgricultureYear 3AGRI30037 - Soil Management90%This subject will provide students with a thorough understanding of key soil chemical, physical and biological processes to enable practical solutions to soil management issues at appropriate scales. The subject will discuss major soil management issues such as: carbon storage; soil acidification; salinity; erosion and sodicity, including soil structure and its maintenance; the use of fertilizers, including composts, biosolids, manures and effluents from intensive animal industries and processing plants; the use of soil testing for maintenance of soil fertility and; offsite impacts of management on air and water quality. The role of the soil microbiome in improving plant productivity and the role of soil organisms in improving soil fertility and promoting nutrient transformations will also be explored. Practicals and excursions will be used to demonstrate methods of soil survey and land capability assessment.Intended learning outcomes:
1. List the major soil management issues at appropriate scales.
2. Devise appropriate soil management interventions for sustainable agriculture.
3. Demonstrate a knowledge of soil spatial variability and assessment.
4. Be able to demonstrate advanced knowledge of the soil system.
5. Build knowledge appropriate to Certified Professional Soil Scientist performance objectives.
Direct
The University of MelbourneVICScienceBachelor of Agriculture (Agricultural economics, plant and soil science, production animal science)Year 2AGRI20038 - Principles of Soil Science100%In this subject the principles of chemistry, physics and biology will be used to determine the effects of agricultural practice on soil. Topics include soil morphology, soil physical and chemical properties, clay mineralogy, soil biology & ecology, soil acidity and alkalinity, and the biogeochemical cycles of C, N, and other elements. Field trips will be used to train students in understanding the relationship between landscapes, soils and land use, and in the description, sampling, and mapping of soils.Intended learning outcomes:
1. The interaction between soil and the environment including climate.
2. Soil genesis, morphology and classification.
3. The biological, chemical and physical characteristics of soils: How a soil functions, the biophysical cycling of nutrients in soil, the consequences of soil degradation and contamination.
Direct
The University of MelbourneVICScienceBachelor of Agriculture (Plant and Soil Science)Year 3AGRI30047 - Soil Fertility and Nutrient Management80%This subject will discuss the role of synthetic and organic fertilisers in maintaining soil fertility for sustainable agricultural production systems. The subject will explore the concepts of soil fertility and nutrient management from the standpoint of chemical, physical and biological processes in soil. Key nutrient cycles in soil will be discussed with a view to understanding plant requirements across a range of agricultural crops, where and why inefficiencies occur in delivery of nutrients to the plant and management strategies that can be used to maximise nutrient use efficiency and minimise environmental impacts of fertiliser application. The role of soil amendments in maintaining soil health will also be explored. Students will be encouraged to critically evaluate the role of conventional and alternative fertilisers for maintaining soil fertility and critically review methods used for assessing different nutrient management approaches. The principles involved in soil and plant sampling and analysis, and commercial laboratory methodologies, will be explored in laboratory and field settings. Students will gain skills in interpretation of laboratory data to provide meaningful fertiliser recommendations to growersIntended learning outcomes:
1. Demonstrate advanced knowledge of the soil-plant system.
2. Interpret soil analytical data with a view to predicting fertiliser requirements.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of synthetic fertilisers in global food production systems.
4. Understand the role of alternative fertilisers in agricultural systems.
5. Develop skills in critical evaluation of fertilisation strategies.
6. Understand the importance of sample collection, processing and analysis protocols for obtaining meaningful data.
Direct
The University of MelbourneVICScienceMaster of Forest Ecosystem Science; Master of Environment (Sustainable forests, Conservation and Restoration, Integrated water catchment management)Year 2
Postgraduate
FRST90022 - Ecosystem Processes of Water and Soil50%The subject follows the fate of water as it moves into and through a broad range of land systems and the soil processes that influence the quality and quantity of water. These landscapes include upland forested catchments, extensively managed rural landscapes, intensive land use along floodplains and urban landscapes. The subject develops knowledge of the key water and soil processes that interact with natural and managed terrestrial systems, and students will gain a solid understanding of ecosystem functioning that will allow them to apply soil and water knowledge to address environmental, conservation and rehabilitation issues. Understanding the role of hydrology and soils across these ecosystems is critical for a range of professions including environmental and agricultural scientists, geographers, ecologists and plant scientists.Intended learning outcomes:
1. Demonstrate a broad understanding of contrasting soils and hydrologic processes and their critical interactions across diverse ecosystems – including natural, intensively managed, and urban.
2. Identify and understand key water and soil processes that are the foundations of ecosystem functioning.
3. Apply the ecosystem paradigm to solving complex soil, environmental and catchment management problems confronting contemporary landscapes.
4. Evaluate and interpret water and soil processes in a diverse range of ecosystems from knowledge and skills gained during the subject field trip to ecosystems from the mountains to the sea.
5. Integrate the practical knowledge and theoretical skills developed in soil and water ecosystem processes, and apply this to real-life ecosystem management, planning and policy issues and problem-solving.
Indirect
The University of New South WalesNSWFaculty of Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental SciencesBachelor of Environmental management, Bachelor of Science and Business, Bachelor of Advanced Science (Honours), Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science (International)Year 3GEOS3721 - Australian Soil Use and Management100%Students will study, interpret and explore the interrelationships between the various soil-forming factors and processes, the physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of soil and how soil is used and managed in Australia. Mapping spatial distribution of soil properties.Learning Outcomes:
1. Fundamental data collection.
2. Data interpretation.
3. Environmental principles management.
4. Acquisition and application of communication to knowledge.
5. Theory practice.
6. Laboratory and fieldwork will provide practical skills in a range of geological, geomorphological and soil laboratory methods.
7. The course also emphasises the development of: Report and essay writing, project planning and management, including data collection and interpretation, group working, co-ordination and delegation
Direct
The University of New South WalesNSWFaculty of Engineering, School of Civil and Environmental EngineeringBachelor of Engineering (Honours)Year 3CVEN3202 - Soil Mechanics80%Description of soil, basic phase relationships, clay mineralogy, confined and unconfined seepage, principle of effective stress, consolidation theory, compaction, stress distribution and settlement, Mohr circle, failure criterion, strength of soils, soil testing, stress-strain behaviour of soils and slope stability.Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
1. Understand the fundamentals of the behaviour of soil as an engineering material.
2. Relate to those aspects of soil behaviour which have a significant environmental impact.
3. Be able to solve a range of soil related problems especially those involving water flow, soil settlement and soil strength.
4. Have a sound basis for further formal study and self-study in the geotechnical engineering area.
5. Be developing a rational approach to problem solving which will lead to the development of design skills.
Direct
The University of New South WalesNSWFaculty of Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental SciencesBachelor of Environmental management; Bachelor of Science and Business; Bachelor of Advanced Science (Honours); Bachelor of Science; Bachelor of Science (International)Year 2GEOS2721 - Australian Surface Environments and Landforms40%Nature of surface deposits, sediments and soils and the interrelationships with landforms in different environmental settings. Landscape evolution and human impacts/modificaiton of the landscapeSpecific abilities and outcomes that students should be able to demonstrate include:
1. Describe the mix of processes that shape the physical environment and interpret the relationships between factors that control these processes.
2. Distinguish between the key land forming factors and processes operating within coastal and river settings.
3. Identify the relationships between geomorphic processes, sediment transport and the preservation of sedimentary units.
4. Compare modern sedimentary environments and features to those preserved in the rock record.
5. Evaluate the impacts of past environmental changes on a variety of physical landscapes and predict future changes.
6. Explain the relationships between soil forming factors and soil morphological properties.
7. Select and apply a variety of methods and approaches to collecting and analysing data on physical environments and landforms.
Indirect
The University of New South WalesNSWSchool of Minerals and Energy Resources EngineeringBachelor of Engineering (Honours) Civil; Bachelor of Engineering Science Mining Year 4MINE3310 - Mining Geomechanics30-80%This course consists of Soil and Rock Mechanics Modules including the basics of rock and soil behaviours. Soil Mechanics Module comprises of basic soil mechanics, soil classification, phase relationships, effective stress, seepage and flow, compaction and shallow foundations.At the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:
1. Have a working knowledge of the engineering properties of soil and rock.
2. Be able to select and use appropriate methods for the design of soil slopes, retaining walls and simple foundations on soil.
3. Have the necessary grounding in rock mechanics to embark upon a study of the principles of rock engineering.
4. Recognise the evolving nature of the discipline and develop skills to access, evaluate and integrate new knowledge and processes.
Indirect
The University of New South WalesNSWFaculty of Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental SciencesBachelor of Environmental managementYear 1GEOS1701 - Environmental Systems, Processes and Issues20%Landscape and soil evolution, land degradation, pollution, human interaction and impacts.On successful completion of this course, you should be able to:
1. Describe fundamental process and form relationships of physical environmental systems.
2. Interpret past, present and future controls on physical environments.
3. Discuss complex human-physical relationships causing Australian and global environmental management issues.
4. Identify pathways and challenges involved in solving these environmental problems.
5. Formulate and solve real problems in relation to environmental data using basic statistical analysis, presentation of data plots, using methods appropriate to the problem and available data.
6. Construct written work which is logically and professionally presented using the scientific method.
7. Convey data, statistics and graphical results so that non-experts can understand the key outcomes of analyses.
8. Self-manage successful time management strategies.
9. Articulate formulated and reasoned opinions and arguments on environmental issues in front of your classmates.
10. Participate actively and productively in team-based discussions of environmental issues and problems.
11. Complete independent research and learning using a variety of internet based resources and computing skills.
12. Be aware of various methods, techniques and approaches used to monitor and measure different physical environments.
13. Use word processing, data spreadsheet and geo-spatial software.
Indirect
The University of New South WalesNSWFaculty of Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental SciencesBachelor of Environmental management; Bachelor of Science and Business; Bachelor of Advanced Science (Honours); Bachelor of Science; Bachelor of Science (International)Year 2GEOS2291 - Earth's Interconnections20%Measuring environmental quality, earth processes, human impact upon soil, monitoring impact of agriculture, manufacturing, mining, coal seam gas, soi and gas developments.This course will give an appreciation of the close links between the hydrological cycle, biogeochemical cycles and ecosystem health. You will develop your skills in:
1. Measuring water chemistry and fluxes.
2. Measuring air chemistry and mapping greenhouse gases sources and sinks.
3. Analysing spatial and temporal data.
4. Ecosystem characterisation.
5. Report writing.
6. Scientific poster preparation and presentation.
7. Quantifying human impacts on urban environments and natural ecosystems.
Indirect
The University of NewcastleNSWFaculty of Science, School of Environmental and Life SciencesBachelor of Science (Environmental and Analytical Chemistry); Bachelor of Science (Earth Sciences); Bachelor of Science (Geology); Bachelor of Science (Water, Climate and Soils); Environmental Science and Management (Natural Resources and Hazards)Year 2GEOS2060 - Soil properties and processes10%Module 1 Soil Physical Processes: Soil components; soil texture and structure; development and importance of structure in soils; pore size and surface area; bulk density and macroporosity; management of soil structure; infiltration, storage and transmission of water; drainage; irrigation.
Module 2 Soil Chemical Processes: Soil nutrients, sources, supply and movement to roots; mineral and organic components of soils; source and development of surface charge; sources, measurement and treatment of soil acidity; cations and cation exchange; anions and anion exchange.
Module 3 Soil Resources of Australia: Soils in the Australian landscape; environmental factors of soil formation; soil description; soil maps and mapping; soil forming processes; the main Soil types/orders of Australia, their distribution, attributes and limitations; soil selection and versatility.
Module 4 Soil Biology: Importance and fractions of soil organic matter; decomposition of organic matter, humus formation and release of nutrients; nitrogen fixation; nitrogen cycle; earthworms and soil fertility; mycorrhizal fungi.
On successful completion of the course students will be able to:
1. Appreciate and understand the physical properties of soil.
2. Understand why soils vary in their irrigation/drainage requirements for enhanced production.
3. Appreciate and understand the chemical properties of soil.
4. Appreciate and understand the organic component of soils.
5. Appreciate and understand the soil resources of australia.
6. Understand how soil resource information is collected, and how to evaluate soils for various land use practices.
Direct
The University of NewcastleNSWFaculty of Science, Global Centre for Environmental RemediationBachelor of Science (Earth Science)Year 1 (semester 1) [masters]
6000 level?
ERAR6002 - Chemodynamics of Environmental Contaminants50%Topics covered include:
(a) An overview introduction to the contaminants and their fate in environment, especially in soils;
(b) Introduction of major soil components that include inorganic mineral and organic components;
(c) Chemical reactions of contaminants, including the origin of charged surfaces on soil particles, surface charge and solute interactions, cation exchange, anion retention, redox reactions, precipitation/dissolution;
(d) The biological reactions of contaminants with soil components, including methylation/demethylation of metalloids, degradation of pesticides, mineralization and immobilization;
(e) The contaminant transport procedure in soils, including leaching, runoff and volatilization;
(f) The major factors that controlling contaminants reacting in soils, including soil pH, soil components, soil solution composition, rhizosphere effects;
(g) The concept of bioavailability of contaminants, and the chemical and biological indices;
(h) The bioavailability of contaminants and its manipulation for risk assessment and management;
(i) The laboratory training of measuring key soil properties, including soil pH, pH buffering capacity, cation exchange capacity, soil organic matter and respiration, sorption procedures, and bioavailability assays;
(j) Data manipulation, interpretation, analysis and communication of results.
On successful completion of the course students will be able to:
1. Explain the underlying principles governing the transformation and transport of contaminants in the environment.
2. Predict possible/probable biotic and abiotic transformation products of contaminants.
3. Describe transport processes between environmental compartments.
4. Calculate mass transport of contaminants between various environmental matrices
5. Apply knowledge and techniques in qualitative and quantitative research approaches.
6. Critically review scientific literature covering contaminants transformation and fate in different ecosystems.
7. Determine critical parameters governing transport processes in porous media.
8. Determine various soil properties controlling contaminants reactions
Direct
The University of NewcastleNSWFaculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of EngineeringBachelor of Civil Engineering (Honours) / Bachelor of Environmental Engineering (Honours); Bachelor of Environmental Engineering (Honours) / Bachelor of ScienceYear 3CIVL3431 - Land surface processes and management50%Soils (physical, chemical, biological characteristics; soil formation; Australian soils), soil-veg- atmosphere transfer processes, soil erosion, fertility.On successful completion of the course students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate a broad understanding of the Australian environment, with particular emphasis on the atmospheric environment and soils.
2. Illustrate the theoretical background of land surface transport processes.
3. Employ adequate skills in environmental monitoring (including data collection, storage, retrieval and analysis).
4. Discuss environmental models of land surface processes and apply their knowledge through hands-on experience with hydrological models.
5. Apply model-based tools for management of major environmental issues.
Direct
The University of NewcastleNSWFaculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of EngineeringMaster of Engineering ManagementYear 1/2
[Masters]
6000 level?
CIVL6431 - Land surface process and management50%Soils (physical, chemical, biological characteristics; soil formation; Australian soils), soil-veg- atmosphere transpfer processes, soil erosion, fertility.On successful completion of the course students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate a broad understanding of the Australian environment, with particular emphasis on the atmospheric environment and soils.
2. Illustrate the theoretical background of land surface transport processes.
3. Employ adequate skills in environmental monitoring (including data collection, storage, retrieval and analysis).
4. Discuss environmental models of land surface processes and apply their knowledge through hands-on experience with hydrological models.
5. Apply model-based tools for management of major environmental issues.
6. Research the literature and apply to practical problems.
Direct
The University of NewcastleNSWFaculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of EngineeringYear 2CIVL2280 - Geomechanics 110%Soil mechanics/physicsOn successful completion of the course students will be able to:
1. To identify and understand the physical and chemical properties of soils and rocks of engineering interest.
2. Understand the basic concepts of engineering geology and know how to apply them in civil engineering practice.
3. To understand the central role played by the principle of effective stress in soil mechanics and geotechnical design.
4. To calculate flow rate of water through saturated soil using Darcy’s law and flow theory.
5. To understand the theory of one-dimensional consolidation in soft soils.
6. To estimate the stresses in soils and the deformation properties of soils and introduce the concepts of settlement and consolidation.
7. To illustrate the basic properties of soils and rocks by laboratory methods and field work.
Indirect
The University of NewcastleNSWFaculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of EngineeringBachelor of Civil Engineering (Honours) / Bachelor of Environmental Engineering (Honours)Year 3CIVL3280 - Geomechanics 230-80%The content of the course includes failure criteria, the use of the effective stress principle for estimating the strength properties of soil and rock.
Specific topics covered in detail include the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion for soils, soil shear strength, critical state soil models, foundation and retaining wall design, seismic behaviour of soils, and rock and soil slope stability.
On successful completion of the course students will be able to:
1. Interpret the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion for geomaterials and apply it in geotechnical analysis and design.
2. Calculate and explain soil shear strength and strength parameters.
3. Apply basic concepts in critical state soil mechanics to describe soil behaviour.
4. Apply strength failure criteria to the analysis of shallow foundations, retaining walls and slope stability.
5. Conduct basic laboratory experiments and derive soil shear strength and strength parameters from these experiments.
Indirect
The University of QueenslandQLDFaculty of Science, School of Agriculture and Food SciencesBachelor of Science (Soil and plant Bioscience); Bachelor of Sustainable agricultureYear 2LAND2003 -The Soil Environment100%Soil fertility & management. Elementary biology, physics & chemistry of soils. Plant nutrients & their cycling. Land capability assessment, soil physical factors & plant growth. Soils as environmental buffers.After successfully completing this course you should be able to:
1. Understand basic terms encountered in the vocabulary of soil science.
2. Describe how soils are formed and state the factors that govern formation.
3. Link landscape features and parent material to soil type at a basic level.
4. Describe a soil profile in the field and classify it to a soil type.
5. List the components of the soil system and outline their principal functions for good soil quality and plant growth.
6. Identify the nutrient pools in different ecosystems (water and nutrient supply, environmental buffering) and assess their benefits/disadvantages.
7. Make simple diagnosis of main nutrient deficiencies in plants.
8. Link soil properties to their field behaviour.
9. Describe strategies to overcome/prevent environmental degradation, especially eutrophication, salinity/sodicity and erosion.
10. Demonstrate skills in literature search, critiquing and communicating research findings and practical results.
11. Demonstrate skills in time management and independent work through timely submission of written work.
12. Describe the importance of soil microorganisms to nutrient cycling.
Direct
The University of QueenslandQLDFaculty of Science, School of Agriculture and Food SciencesBachelor of Science (Soil and Plant Bioscience); Bachelor of Sustainable agricultureYear 3LAND3005 - Soil Plant Relationships50%Understanding of role of soil in plant growth, underlying mechanisms, analysis, microbiology.After successfully completing this course you should be able to:
1. Recognise the processes by which the solid-phase regulates the availability of nutrients/toxins in the soil solution.
2. Recognise that the soil has various reservoirs of nutrients, and that these reservoirs differ in their availability to plants.
3. Recognise the importance of biological organisms in cycling nutrients in soil.
4. Recognise the importance of the physical properties of the soil (such as texture and structure) for the growth of plants.
5. Recognise the major problems facing Soil Scientists in Australia and throughout the world (such as salinity and acidity), and by applying the underlying theory gained throughout the Course, recognise how these issues can be overcome.
6. Develop a practical understanding of the methods used to measure and asses important chemical, biological, and physical properties of soil.
7. Develop skills to demonstrate an ability to solve a range of soil science problems, both individually and as part of a team.
8. Recognise that soil is a valued resource managed by a wide variety of people who are managing the soil to achieve a range of outcomes.
Direct
The University of QueenslandQLDFaculty of Science, School of Agriculture and Food SciencesMaster Agricultural Science; Graduate Certificate in Agricultural SciencePostgraduateLAND7009 - Soil and Growth Media Management90%Properties of soils and other mineral-based media (mine spoil, waste rock, tailings); the impacts of soil physical and chemical properties on plant growth and vegetative community development and sustainability; soil sampling strategies; trace and toxic elements, organic pollutants and soil amendments, and nutrient management for the development of a favourable plant root zone.After successfully completing this course you should be able to:
1. Understand, and acquire basic terms encountered in the vocabulary of soil science.
2. Describe how soils are formed and state the factors that govern formation.
3. Link landscape features and parent material to soil type at a basic level.
4. Describe a soil profile in the field and classify it to a soil type.
5. List the components of the soil system and outline their principal functions for good soil quality and plant growth.
6. State the nutrient pools in different ecosystems (water and nutrient supply, environmental buffering) and assess their benefits/disadvantages.
7. Make simple diagnoses of primary nutrient deficiencies in plants.
8. Link soil properties to their field behaviour.
9. Describe strategies to overcome/prevent environmental degradation, especially eutrophication, salinity/sodicity and erosion.
10. Demonstrate skills in literature search, critiquing and communicating research findings and practical results.
11. Demonstrate skills in time management and independent work through timely submission of written work
Direct
The University of QueenslandQLDFaculty of Science, School of Agriculture and Food SciencesMaster of Agricultural SciencePostgraduateLAND7000 - Water & Land Resource Management>80%Soil Constituents, Plant Nutrients and Processes plant nutrient availability, and Soil Physical Fertility. Principles of sustainable land & water resource use for agriculture, forests, rangelands, recreation areas & urban zones; development of practical land management packages for conservation of land & water resources.After successfully completing this course you should be able to:
1. Understand, and acquire basic terms encountered in the vocabulary of soil science.
2. Describe how soils are formed and state the factors that govern formation.
3. Link landscape features and parent material to soil type at a basic level.
4. Describe a soil profile in the field and classify it to a soil type.
5. List the components of the soil system and outline their principal functions for good soil quality and plant growth.
6. State the nutrient pools in different ecosystems (water and nutrient supply, environmental buffering) and assess their benefits/disadvantages.
7. Make simple diagnoses of primary nutrient deficiencies in plants.
8. Link soil properties to their field behaviour.
9. Describe strategies to overcome/prevent environmental degradation, especially eutrophication, salinity/sodicity and erosion.
10. Demonstrate skills in literature search, critiquing and communicating research findings and practical results.
11. Demonstrate skills in time management and independent work through timely submission of written work.
Direct
The University of QueenslandQLDFaculty of Engineering, Architecture & Information TechnologyBachelor of Engineering (Honours)Year 2CIVL2210 - Soil Mechanics>80%Understanding soil, using engineering classification systems and their application. Testing the compaction and field density of soils. Determining the hydraulic conductivity of soils. Analysing seepage flows through saturated soilsAfter successfully completing this course you should be able to:
1. Understand and manipulate phase relationships for soils.
2. Understand soil, use engineering classification systems and their application.
3. Test the compaction and field density of soils.
4. Determine the hydraulic conductivity of soils in the laboratory and in the field.
5. Analyse seepage flows through saturated soils.
6. Understand the concept and importance of effective stress in soil mechanics theory.
7. Determine and describe the strength of soils from tests and basic theories.
8. Understand the concept of consolidation of fine-grained soils and testing methods used.
Direct
The University of QueenslandQLDSchool of Agriculture and Food SciencesBachelor of Agricultural Science (Agronomy)Year 3LAND3006 - Soils, Landscapes & Environments>80%Science of pedology & the application of field pedology. Investigation & interpretation of soil & soil material in the field. Developing the skills of identifying, surveying, interpreting & classifying soils in the landscape. Soil formation & development processes including weathering & erosion & their relationship to land managementAfter successfully completing this course you should be able to:
1. Gain a thorough understanding of pedological processes
2. Critically assess and advice on suitable land use options
3. Be proficient in the use of the Australian Soil Classification System.
4. Able to conduct and interpret soil and land resource surveys.
5. Understand and articulate how pedology is an integral part within the multidisciplinary field of natural resource management.
Direct
The University of SydneyNSWFaculty of ScienceBachelor of Liberal Arts and Science (Soil Science and Hydrology) ; Bachelor of Science (Agroecosystems major in soil science and hydrology); Bachelor Science (Soil Science and Hydrology); Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Soil Science and Hydrology)Year 3SOIL3888 - Protecting the Soil Resource>80%The SOIL3888 interdisciplinary project unit provides an opportunity for you to be part of an interdisciplinary student team that investigates a real world problem involving soil in regional or peri-urban NSW. Each student will select to work on a project related to agriculture or to the environment. Both projects will involve 2-5 days of fieldwork for soil observation and sampling. Students will work collaboratively in a series of practical sessions (before and after the fieldwork) to digitally map soil attributes, and to critically analyse all collected and mapped data. Each project group will then compile a 'consultant's report' for the landholder(s), detailing the issue or problem, the diagnosis and the recommended management strategies to optimize crop production/ecosystem services, while protecting the soil resource. NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
The University of SydneyNSWFaculty of ScienceGraduate Diploma in Agriculture and Environment, Master of Agriculture and EnvrionmentYear 3SOIL3010/AFNR5510 - The Soil at Work>80%This is a problem-based applied soil science unit addressing the physical, chemical and biological components of soil function. It is designed to allow students to identify soil-related problems in the real-world and by working in a group and with an end-user, to suggest short and long-term solutions to problems such as fertility, resilience, carbon management, structural decline, acidification, salinisation and contamination. NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
The University of SydneyNSWFaculty of ScienceBachelor of Science + double degrees; Bachelor of commerce, Bachelor of Arts/Doctor of Medicine, Bachelor of Advanced Computing/Bachelor of Science (Health); Bachelor of Advanced Computing/Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Advanced Computing; Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Economics, Bachelor of Design Computing/Bachelor of Advanced studies; Bachelor of Engineering Honours/Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music (Performance, Composition), Bachelor of Visual Arts
Year 3SOIL3009 - Contemporary Field and Lab Soil Science>80%This unit of study is concerned with exploring the key pedology, soil chemistry, soil physical and soil biological processes that drive these challenges to soil quality.Time will be spent investigating how the quality of the soil can be assessed, using the indicators of the mentioned soil processes, and how the resulting data can be aggregated and communicated in a meaningful way. Working with case studies, the students will identify problems that are assessed using soil quality or function analysis with the aim of identifying management options. The management options will be evaluated to determine their adoptability and implement ability. By investigating the case studies using soil quality or function analysis students will develop their research and enquiry skills. Assessing and developing adoptable management strategies the students will develop their skills in synthesising material from multiple sources and enhance their intellectual autonomy. By producing reports and presenting seminars the students will develop their communication skills.Direct
The University of SydneyNSWFaculty of ScienceBachelor of Science + double degrees; Bachelor of commerce, Bachelor of Arts/Doctor of Medicine, Bachelor of Advanced Computing/Bachelor of Science (Health); Bachelor of Advanced Computing/Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Advanced Computing; Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Economics, Bachelor of Design Computing/Bachelor of Advanced studies; Bachelor of Engineering Honours/Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music (Performance, Composition), Bachelor of Visual Arts
Year 2SOIL2005 - Soil and Water: Earth's Life Support Systems80%This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the fundamental properties and processes of soil and water that affect food security and sustain ecosystems. These properties and processes are part of the grounding principles that underpin crop and animal production, nutrient and water cycling, and environmental sustainability.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
The University of SydneyNSWFaculty of Engineering and Information TechnologiesMaster of Professional Engineering (Civil, fluids, geomechanical, structural)PostgraduateCIVL9410 - Soil Mechanics>80%The nature of soils as engineering materials; common soil classification schemes; the importance of water in the soil and the effects of water movement; methods of predicting soil settlements, the stress-strain-strength response of soils, and earth pressures.This course provides an elementary introduction to Geotechnical Engineering, and provides the basic mechanics necessary for the detailed study of Geotechnical Engineering. This course aims to provide an understanding of:
1. The nature of soils as engineering materials; common soil classification schemes.
2. The importance of water in the soil and the effects of water movement.
3. Methods of predicting soil settlements, the stress-strain-strength response of soils, and earth pressures.
Direct
The University of SydneyNSWFaculty of Engineering and Information TechnologiesBachelor of Engineering Honours, Master of professional Engineering (Civil, fluids, geomechanical, structural); Grad Cert in Engineering, Grad Dip Engineering, Master of Engineering (Civil, Geomechanical engineering)PostgraduateCIVL5351 - Geoenvironmental Engineering>80%Geoenvironmental Engineering is an applied science concerned with the protection of the subsurface from human activities. It can be divided into 2 main branches: waste containment and treatment of pollution sites. The former is usually a preventative activity, whereas the latter is corrective, i. e. it occurs after pollution has taken place. Geoenvironmental Engineering draws on fundamental science, especially the chemistry of low-permeability material such as clay, fluid flow in soil and contaminant migration in soil.Learning Outcomes:
1. Analyse flow regime in soil using Darcy equation.
2. Analyse contaminant migration in soil using coupled flow and reactive diffusion-advection equations.
3. Design a single or double composite landfill liner satisfying groundwater quality requirements.
4. Predict the potential for methane production in a landfill and assess the feasibility of waste-to-energy conversion.
5. Conduct research on a geoenvironmental topic as part for group.
Direct
The University of SydneyNSWFaculty of Engineering and Information TechnologiesBachelor of Engineering (Honours) + combined degreesYear 2CIVL2410 - Soil Mechanics>80%The nature of soils as engineering materials; common soil classification schemes; the importance of water in the soil and the effects of water movement; methods of predicting soil settlements, the stress-strain-strength response of soils, and earth pressures.This course aims to provide an understanding of:
1. The nature of soils as engineering materials; common soil classification schemes;
2. The importance of water in the soil and the effects of water movement.
3. Methods of predicting soil settlements, the stress-strain-strength response of soils, and earth pressures.
Direct
The University of SydneyNSWFaculty of ScienceGrad Certificate in Environmental Science, Graduate Certificate in Sustainability; Graduate Diploma in Agriculture and Environment; Graduate Diploma in Environmental Science; Graduate Diploma in Sustainability; Master of Agriculture and Environment; Master of Environmental Science; Master of Environmental Science and Law; Master of Sustainability; Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Agriculture)Year 1
[Masters]
AFNR5511 - Soil Processes, Assessment and Management>80%Pedology, soil chemistry, soil physical and the soil biological processes that drive these challenges to soil quality.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
The University of SydneyNSWFaculty of Science
Department/School: Life and Environmental Sciences Academic Operations
Graduate Certificate in Sustainability; Graduate Diploma in Agriculture and Environment; Graduate Diploma in Sustainability; Master of Agriculture and Environment; Master of SustainabilityYear 1
[Masters]
AFNR5502 - Remote Sensing, GIS and Land Management>80%Remote Sensing (RS), linked with Geographical Information Systems (GIS), as applied to land management problems.
Review the basic principles of GIS and then focus on advanced RS principles and techniques used for land resource assessment and management.
Design a land management project and actualise it using integrated GIS and RS techniques.
The unit thus consists of three separate but overlapping parts:
1. A short theoretical part which focuses on the concepts of RS.
2. A practical part which aims at developing hands-on skills in using RS tools, and
3. An application-focused module in which students will learn the skills of how to design a land management project and actualise it using integrated GIS and RS techniques.
Direct
The University of SydneyNSWFaculty of ScienceBachelor of Science + double degrees; Bachelor of commerce; Bachelor of Arts/Doctor of Medicine; Bachelor of Advanced Computing/Bachelor of Science (Health); Bachelor of Advanced Computing/Bachelor of Commerce; Bachelor of Advanced Computing; Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Economics; Bachelor of Design Computing/Bachelor of Advanced studies; Bachelor of Engineering Honours/Bachelor of Arts; Bachelor of Music (Performance, Composition); Bachelor of Visual Arts
Year 2 SOIL2004 - The Soil Resource100%This unit will familiarise students with the description and mapping of soil types in the Australian landscape, with common analytical methods for soil and with the various forms of degradation that may alter the quality and function of soil. The first practical component of the unit, a six-day soil survey, will give students experience in soil description and classification in the field, and soil samples collected during this survey will be subsequently analysed for a variety of attributes by the students in laboratory practicals. In the lecture series, topics including soil security, soil fertility and soil degradation will be discussed and linked to practical sessions. By the end of this unit, students will be able to construct maps of soil properties and soil type distribution, describe primary soil functions, soil attributes and types of soil degradation in an agricultural context, and be able to recognize and communicate the ability of a soil profile to sustain plant growth. Students will gain research and inquiry skills by collecting, analysing and interpreting soil survey data, and will gain communication skills by having to prepare and present a poster.Direct
The University of SydneyNSWFaculty of ScienceBachelor of Science + double degrees; Bachelor of commerce; Bachelor of Arts/Doctor of Medicine; Bachelor of Advanced Computing/Bachelor of Science (Health); Bachelor of Advanced Computing/Bachelor of Commerce; Bachelor of Advanced Computing; Bachelor of Arts; Bachelor of Economics; Bachelor of Design Computing/Bachelor of Advanced studies; Bachelor of Engineering Honours/Bachelor of Arts; Bachelor of Music (Performance, Composition); Bachelor of Visual Arts; Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Advanced Studies(Agriculture)
Year 2GEOS2116 - Earth Surface Processes30-80%Planetary and regional-scale controls on landforms and landscape dynamics, and the nature and distribution of major Australian landscape typesIn Earth Surface Processes, you will learn how landscapes are produced, and what this means for contemporary land use. Lectures by experts in physical geography, geology, soil science and environmental science will introduce you to the planetary and regional-scale controls on landforms and landscape dynamics, and the nature and distribution of major Australian landscape types. Focussed around 'hands on' field and laboratory-based tasks, students will gain essential practical, analytical and interpretive skills in the analysis of landscapes and earth surface processes that shape them. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the planet on which they live.Indirect
The University of WAWAFaculty of ScienceBachelor of Environmental Science; Bachelor of Agricultural Science; Bachelor of ScienceYear 2ENVT2236 - Soil Science100%This is an introductory unit covering the fundamentals of soil science in the context of agriculture, environmental science and geography. In field, practical and lecture classes the unit covers soil description and morphology (pedology); soil formation (pedogenesis); detailed soil biological, chemical and physical processes and properties, including an introduction to the cycling of water and nutrients in soils; plus soil acidification and salinity. It addresses the consequences of soil and landscape properties for environmental management, and land uses such as agriculture, horticulture, habitation and infrastructure.Students are able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the dynamics and formation of soils and the influence of climate, landform and geology.
2. Explain the fundamentals of physical, chemical and biological processes and functions in soils, including soil biogeochemical cycles.
3. Apply skills in laboratory analysis and field observation of soils and their landscapes.
4. Integrate diverse soil knowledge and apply it to problems in environmental science, agriculture and geography.
5. Apply professional skills in scientific communication in the context of soils and soil environments.
Direct
The University of WAWAFaculty of ScienceBachelor of Agricultural ScienceYear 3ENVT3060 - Soil–Plant Interactions>80%This unit seeks to examine the soil as an environment for the growth of plants, and to develop a basic understanding of plant nutrition. The unit integrates knowledge of biological components of soil fertility with the physical and chemical components of soil. The role of soil biota in cycling nutrients for plants and in the development of a suitable environment for plant growth is emphasised. These aspects are considered in the context of soil management to maintain sustainable agricultural, horticultural and forest production, to restore disturbed natural ecosystems and to understand processes in managed and natural ecosystems.Students are able to:
1. Understand nutrient cycling in the soil–microbe–plant continuum and soil–plant interactions governing resistance to abiotic stresses.
2. Integrate concepts related to soil fertility and land use in sustainable land management.
3. Record, analyse, critically assess, present and discuss experimental data.
4. Write concise research reports describing the methods used and data acquired, relate them to published knowledge and place them in a broader environmental and social context.
5. Work individually and in groups to solve problems related to soil fertility and land use.
Direct
The University of WAWAFaculty of ScienceMaster of Agricultural Science; Master of Environmental Science; Master of Biotechnology; Master of Science; Master of Geoscience; Master of Hydrology; Bachelor of Science (Honours)PostgraduateENVT5510 - Soil Dynamics100%Earth surface materials such as soils, sediments and regolith are essential for the survival of terrestrial ecosystems, and are complex systems with interacting chemical, physical and biological processes. This unit investigates these processes in detail, aiming to understand and quantify the mechanisms involved. Drawing on soil and sediment geochemistry, soil hydrology and soil physics, and soil microbiology, the unit addresses diverse and relevant issues of how the dynamic nature of soil relates to the transport and reactions of elements and minerals, as well as how the soil three-dimensional matrix regulates soil biodiversity. The unit provides students with the ability to investigate soils using experimental and/or modelling skills and apply these to real-world examples relevant to remediation professional practice in areas such as agriculture, environmental science and land rehabilitation.Students are able to:
1. Understand, assess and quantify equilibrium and time-dependent chemical processes in soil.
2. Understand, assess and quantify transport of water and solutes in soils, including the soil water balance.
3. Understand and assess microbial processes and populations in soils.
4. Integrate and analyse the interdependence of chemical, biological and physical processes in soil in relation to soil functions under managed and natural conditions.
5. Apply process-based understanding to real issues in soil science.
Direct
The University of WAWAFaculty of ScienceMaster of Agricultural SciencePostgraduateENVT4401 - Advanced Land Use and Management50%This unit focuses on field-based assessment of land and water resources. It is a more advanced treatment of soil mapping, land use and catchment hydrology. The unit brings students to a professional level of knowledge and skills assessing land use and land capability. The field sites are chosen to have various constraints and land use changes. The unit addresses different land uses in fluvial, agricultural and mining landscapes and its influences on soils and water. This is integrated with the assessment of soils and land use to provide sustainable land use management. Students acquire skills in soil and land capability mapping at a professional level so that they can independently assess soil resources; and hydrological assessment of land with field methods, probing soil hydraulic properties, infiltration capacity, susceptibility of runoff and erosion. There are three different field trips in the surroundings of the Perth landscape where students describe and sample soils in the field. Students are able to:
1. Analyse and map soils to demonstrate an understanding their functions under different land use.
2. Evaluate land capabilities and properties based on field observations and laboratory testing.
3. Evaluate and report in a professional manner results of field and laboratory investigations that aid in land use decision making.
4. Evaluate the hydrological responses of land in the context of different land uses and changing environmental conditions.
Indirect
The University of WAWACivil, Environmental and Mining EngineeringEngineering Science majorYear 2ENSC3009 - Geomechanics30-80%Topics include weathering; erosion; minerals, rock and soil types; the rock cycle, rock-forming processes and soil-forming processes. Full use is made of available video footage and demonstration models and students gain hands-on experience of various soil and rock types. The unit then deals with concepts of effective stress; soil compression and consolidation; seepage; and the strength and deformation properties of soil. The underlying framework is that of critical state soil mechanics which links the strength and stiffness of soil to the density and effective stress level. Students observe and report on laboratory experiments designed to supplement understanding gained at lectures on the strength and compressibility of soils.Students are able to:
1. Write concise technical reports.
2. Apply critical thinking to assignments and laboratory work.
3. Use interpersonal skills when working in teams.
4. Identify the role of geotechnical engineering in the civil engineering design process.
5. Apply geotechnical design principles in civil engineering design.
6. Identify soil properties of compressibility and strength for soil foundation design
7. Perform soil laboratory tests on soil properties for foundation design.
8. Assess the pros and cons of soil laboratory testing and in situ soil field tests.
9. Work in teams.
Indirect
The University of Western AustraliaWAFaculty of ScienceBachelor of Environmental Science; Bachelor of Science; Master of Agricultural ScienceYear 3, postgradENVT3338 - Land Capability Assessment80%Understanding how soils and landscapes have evolved provides the key to managing terrestrial environments effectively and making sound decisions for sustainable land use. This unit covers the processes contributing to soil formation and degradation such chemical transformation, translocation of solids and fluids and wind or water erosion for example. These processes are presented within a geomorphic and hydrological context. Based on this understanding soil classification is introduced, followed by the definition and mapping of soil and land capability classes which form the basis of a land capability assessment.Students are able to:
1. Describe, assess and sample soil profiles in different landscape positions.
2. Classify soil properties in the field and use laboratory techniques to determine texture, phosphorus retention or cation exchange capacity and water retention.
3. Classify and map soils and landforms and relate these to land use and soil degradation such as salinisation, desertification and soil acidification. Perform a land capability assessment.
Direct
University of CanberraACTFaculty of Science and TechnologyBachelor of Environmental Science; Bachelor of ScienceYear 2, Sem 110224 - Integrated Catchment Science - 3 cp, Level 2>80%Soil classification, Hydrology, Geomorphology and Landscape processes (physical, chemical and Biological.On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
1. Identify key characteristics and features that distinguish different geomorphic and ecological zones in the landscape, including geomorphic units and their age, soil types, surface and ground water hydrology and ecological character and diversity.
2. Make assessments of landscape elements at a variety of landscape scales, in terms of, physical and chemical and biological processes, relationship to other environmental aspects, surface stability, potential hazards and management issues
3. Identify how variability in hydrological, geological and ecological processes connect or disconnect different elements of the landscape from one another on timescales from hours to millennia. Also, be able to describe how variation in connectivity is related to the frequency and magnitude of climatic events, and what implications this has for management of different parts of the catchment.
4. Demonstrate skills in scientific communication, in particular presenting data and argument clearly and concisely to address a question, to a relevant targeted audience.
5. Demonstrate skills in team work through group projects related to the practical components of the unit.
6. Adapt concepts developed from local examples into a global context.
Direct
University of CanberraACTFaculty of Science and TechnologyBachelor of Environmental Science; Bachelor of ScienceYear 210225 - Landscape Processes - 3 cp, Level 2>80%This unit is about the interacting landscape processes that produce the conditions and materials of surface and near surface environments on the Earth. It will provide students with skills in observing and interpreting landscape processes and their products, as well as an understanding of the nature and origin of landscapes, particularly in the Australian context. The unit will use real world examples from the local region to illustrate important geological, geomorphological, pedological, and hydrological concepts and methods. The unit is designed to provide a strong scientific foundation for understanding landscape processes in relation to contemporary problems and issues such as: global environmental change, geo-hazards, water quality, soil health and ecosystem degradation.On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the major landscape processes and their interactions
2. Demonstrate knowledge of the various landscape types and surface environments.
3. Apply skills and latest relevant technology in observing and interpreting landscape processes and their products.
4. Communicate the broader context of earth surface evolution and the implications for land, water and ecosystem stewardship with a global perspective.
5. Work effectively as individuals and in teams in reporting field observations and synthesizing these into a broader understanding of landscape processes.
Direct
University of New EnglandNSWBachelor of Environmental ScienceYear 2SOIL222 - Soil Science>80%This unit introduces soil; the way it functions in a landscape, the myriad interactions with the water, carbon and nutrients that sustain life, and the damage human activity can do to its health and productivity. Students will get their hands 'dirty' and learn how to assess and examine soil.Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate specialised and integrated knowledge of soil function in urban and rural landscapes and make recommendations for land management.
2. Describe, analyse and calculate the fundamental soil physical properties and explain how these relate to soil behaviour and management.
3. Explain and interpret the core concepts of soil chemistry, biology and nutrient cycling in terms of soil processes.
4. Demonstrate theoretical and practical knowledge and skills to utilise a range of practical field and laboratory techniques to assess soil properties.
Direct
University of New EnglandNSWBachelor of Environmental Science (Remediation and Restoration); Bachelor of Environmental Science (Conservation Ecology); Bachelor of Environmental Science (Envirobusiness); Bachelor of Environmental Science (Natural Resources Management)Year 2SOIL310 - Soils, Pollution and the Environment>80%Soil physical, chemical and biological processes. Sampling and analysis techniques for soil pollution.Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of soil physical, chemical and biological processes that are important for degraded and polluted land management.
2. Discuss key land degradation and pollution issues and examples, and develop approaches to their assessment, management and remediation.
3. Apply an advanced set of robust sampling and analysis techniques for soil pollution assessment and interpret the results in the context of real world management applications.
4. Source, access and interpret technical, regulatory and guidance material for best practice management; and
work as competent professionals in a multidisciplinary team discipline.
Direct
University of New EnglandNSWBachelor of Agriculture (Plant Production); Bachelor of Agriculture (General Agricultural Production); Bachelor of Agriculture (Technology)Year 2SOIL311 - Productive Soil Systems>80%Students leave this unit with an understanding of the interactions between soil, plants, nutrients, water and climate resulting in productive systems. Students will understand the principles behind increasing resource use efficiency in soil systems. Critical thinking will be encouraged through problem based scenarios designed to emphasise the key processes driving soil fertility. Students will be able to interpret soil and plant tests, diagnose plant nutritional constraints, recommend management options to improve soil productivity, and assess the claims of the myriad products available to improve soil health.Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
1. Analyse and evaluate data in order to interpret soil and plant tissue tests and make recommendations to producers.
2. Analyse, generate and present solutions to unpredictable and often complex soil fertility problems using scientific methods and principles and demonstrate the ability to communicate this knowledge in written and verbal form.
3. Critically appraise products used in agronomic situations using scientific principles demonstrating both a broad and theoretical knowledge of productive soil systems and the ability to autonomously apply this knowledge.
Direct
University of New EnglandNSWBachelor of Environmental Science (Remediation and Restoration); Bachelor of Environmental Science (Conservation Ecology); Bachelor of Environmental Science (Envirobusiness); Bachelor of Environmental Science (Natural Resources Management)Year 3SOIL431 - Soils in Practice>80%Topics include current issues of significance in climate, population and sustainable resource use debates worldwide such as pollution; global nutrient balances; climate change and carbon farming; soil health assessment and soil education.Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
1. Discuss current soil science issues in topical areas to demonstrate an advanced theoretical and technical knowledge of the subject and competency in communicating this information to others in written or verbal form.
2. Demonstrate the ability to analyse critically, evaluate, summarise and communicate information on current soil science issues.
3. Demonstrate an ability to apply insight and acquired knowledge on pertinent soil science issues into debates and professional practices.
4. Generate and transmit solutions to complex problems in soil science today.
Direct
University of South AustraliaSASchool of Natural and Built EnvironmentsBachelor of Engineering (Honours) (Civil and Construction Management); Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) (Civil and Project Management); Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) (Civil and Structural); Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) (Civil); Master of Engineering (Civil and Infrastructure); Master of Engineering (Water Resources Management)Year 3Soil Mechanics (CIVE 3008)>80%Introduction to terminology, engineering soil classification, seepage and compaction, stresses in soil masses due to external loads and pore water pressures, consolidation and excess pore water pressures; strength and stiffness; gravity retaining walls; analysis of slopes with pore water pressures; immediate settlements; total settlement; design of shallow footings for bearing capacity; design of deep footings; site investigations, rock testing; rock mass classification; stress theories and strength criteria; slope stability.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
University of South AustraliaSASchool of Natural and Built EnvironmentsBachelor of Environmental ScienceYear 2Soils in the Australian Landscape (EART 1011)>80%Soil and soil forming processes. Weathering and regolith processes. Components of soils and soil properties, soil types. Soil Chemistry. Soil classification. The Australian soil classification system. Evolution of Australian soil. Characteristic Australian soil landscapes. Soil as a resource, processes of soil degradation, remediation and sustainable management.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
University of South AustraliaSASchool of Natural and Built EnvironmentsPostgraduateSustainable Irrigation Management(CIVE 5075)>80%A comprehensive understanding of the sustainable use of scarce water resources to increase water use efficiency andcrop production and reduce the adverse environmental impacts such as salinity and soil degradation.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
University of South AustraliaSASchool of EngineeringYear 2Materials Science for Environmental Sustainability (NASC 2009)30-80%Soil Remediation: Nutrients and elemental cycles in soils, introduce physical, chemical and biological properties of soils; ecosystem development; material-based remediation techniquesNO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEIndirect
University of Southern QueenslandQLDFaculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences
School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
Bachelor of Engineering (Agriculture)Year 3AGR3304 - Soil Science100%1. Pedogenesis, soil description and classification - 15.00%
2. Soil components and interactions - 25.00%
3. Soil physical processes (structural stability, soil-water, temperature) - 35.00%
4. Soil fertility and plant nutrition - 10.00%
5. Degradation and management of soils - 15.00%
The course objectives define the student learning outcomes for a course. On completion of this course, student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the processes involved in soil formation and the techniques involved in soil description and classification.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the soil components and the nature of the interactions between these components.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of the factors and processes influencing structural stability, water availability and movement, and temperature fluctuations in soils.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of the factors and processes influencing fertility and nutrient cycling in soils.
5. Analyse the factors and processes that lead to the degradation of soil resources and explain the management practices used to minimise and rehabilitate degraded soils.
Direct
University of Southern QueenslandQLDFaculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences
School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
Bachelor of Engineering (Agriculture)Year 3AGR3903 Soil and Water Engineering Practice 2>80%1. Soil formation, description and classification 25%
2. Soil science testing procedures 30%
3. Irrigation performance evaluation 25%
4. Groundwater Hydraulics 20%
The course objectives define the student learning outcomes for a course. On completion of this course, students should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the factors influencing soil formation and the relationships between soils and landscapes.
2. Undertake the field description and classification of soils.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of basic laboratory testing procedures required in soil science.
4. Apply techniques for the evaluation of irrigation performance in the field.
5. Analyse data from a pumping test on a groundwater well and determine the transmissivity and storativity of an aquifer.
Direct
University of Southern QueenslandQLDFaculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences
School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
Bachelor of Engineering (Agriculture)PostgraduateAGR4305 - Agricultural Soil Mechanics100%1. Soil structures. Soil physical properties. 10%
2. Stress theory. Soil failure and mechanical behaviour. Soil strength measurement methods. 15%
3. The tillage process and soil failure modes. Calculation of tillage forces. Analysis and design of tillage tools and implements. 15%
4. Implications of soil compaction on machinery design and for root and plant growth. 10%
5. Development of traction by wheels and tracks. Calculation of soil rolling resistance and wheelslip. Optimum matching between the tractor and the implement. 20%
6. Critical state soil mechanics. 10%
7. Soil compaction and controlled traffic farming method 20%
The course objectives define the student learning outcomes for a course. On completion of this course, students should be able to:
1. Assess soil structure, understand its importance for plant growth.
2. Describe and calculate mechanical and strength properties of soil elements.
3. Evaluate the tillage process and calculate tillage forces.
4. Measure soil forces and compare the influence of different tillage tool designs.
5. Describe and interpret the process of soil compaction, calculate its effect on soil properties, and discuss its effects on plant growth.
6. Calculate tractive forces, rolling resistance and tractive efficiency of tractor/implement systems.
7. Describe and discuss the theory and applications of controlled traffic farming systems.
8. Describe and discuss the concept of critical state soil mechanics.
Direct
University of Southern QueenslandQLDFaculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences
School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
Bachelor of Engineering (Agriculture)Year 2CIV2403 - Geology and Geomechanics30-80%1. Introduction and Physical Properties of Soils 10%
2. Effective Stress Concept 10%
3. Permeability and Flow Nets 25%
4. Stress Distribution in Soil 15%
5. Consolidation of Soil and Settlement of Structures 15%
The course objectives define the student learning outcomes for a course. On completion of this course students will be able to:
1. Examine and categorise a limited group of minerals and outline key identification features.
2. Examine and categorise hand specimens of rocks commonly used as construction material, assess the major physical properties, and state their material limitations in specific applications.
3. Distinguish structural properties of rocks, particularly faults, folds, and joints, and interpret their significance for engineering.
4. Explain weathering processes and soil formation processes.
5. Interpret geological maps and cross sections to a limited extent and relate such information to engineering.
6. Understand the geological principles and procedures used in a site investigation and the engineering properties of rocks to appraise/survey geological materials.
7. Understand the basic characteristics of soils such as soil physics, soil compaction, soil chemistry, soil plasticity, particle size distribution and soil classification.
8. Explain the concept of effective and total stresses in saturated soils.
9. Apply Darcy's Law to simple soil structures and find permeability characteristics from the provided test data; employ the procedures involved in constructing flow nets to solve specific problems.
10. Use available methods to estimate elastic stress changes in soil and calculate elastic settlement under a variety of external loading systems.
11. Calculate the consolidation settlement under a single footing using the concept of one dimensional consolidation theory.
Indirect
University of Southern QueenslandQLDFaculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences
School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
Bachelor of Engineering (Agriculture); Bachelor of Engineering (Environmental)ENV4106 Irrigation Science30-80%Soil plant atmosphere continuum, hydrology, drainage, and salinity balance in the root zone.The course objectives define the student learning outcomes for a course. On completion of this course, students should be able to:
1. Evaluate the factors limiting the performance of irrigated agriculture (in particular Australian irrigated agriculture) and urban irrigation and assess the technologies and management strategies available to address those limitations.
2. Describe quantitatively the occurrence and movement of water in soils, including the processes of infiltration, redistribution and drying, and the upward movement of water from a water-table.
3. Describe quantitatively the fundamental physics of atmospheric evapo-transpiration; and assess the relative magnitudes of the various factors controlling evaporation in any given agricultural or naturally-vegetated situation.
4. Determine the actual crop evaporation from standard daily Bureau of Meteorology station data using the 'FA056-Penman-Monteith' method; evaluate in comparison with standard evaporation pan data; and hence determine the water requirement of crops and prepare workable irrigation schedules.
5. Analyse the characteristics of irrigation application methods (surface, sprinkler and micro-irrigation), evaluate system performance, and design systems for maximum performance.
6. Apply the technologies and practices required to maintain sustainable irrigation, including the maintenance of acceptable salt balances in the root zone and the provision of adequate drainage.
Indirect
University of Southern QueenslandQLDFaculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences
School of Sciences
Bachelor of Science (Plant Agricultural Science)Year 2AGR2303 Agronomy30-80%Land preparation, tillage and planting approaches, fertiliser use, and the impacts of cropping on soil, water and other species.On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
1. Explain the characteristics of the main field crops, pasture plants and horticultural species used in Australian farming systems.
2. Apply competence in the design and analysis of crop production systems.
3. Apply an appreciation of the principles of crop and pasture production used in Australian cropping systems
4. Critically evaluate the main biological threats to crop health.
5. Integrate knowledge of the interactions between cropping systems and the landscape in which they reside
6. Critically evaluate the natural, demographic, logistical, economic and political pressures facing food producers.
Indirect
University of TasmaniaTASCollege of Sciences and Engineering
Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
Master of Applied Science (Agricultural Science)PostgraduateSoil Science KLA613>80%Chemical and physical soil analyses and interpreting soil analytical data for management of soil related environmental management problems. Issues covered include: management of salinity, soil drainage, soil water retention and measurement for plant growth, soil erosion management and control, and soil chemical properties and processes.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
University of TasmaniaTASCollege of Sciences and Engineering
Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)(Civil and Environmental Engineering)Year 3Soil Science KLA397>80%Basic soil analyses and interpreting soil analytical data for management of soil physical, chemical and morphological problems. Issues covered include: management of salinity, soil drainage design, soil water retention and irrigation principles, soil biology, erosion control, and soil chemical processes. The unit involves field description and sampling of several soil profiles. The soil profiles are then analysed as a class exercise and interpretations and soil management plans are developed.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
University of TasmaniaTASUniversity CollegeAssociate Degree in AgribusinessYear 2Principles of Soil Management ZAB224>80%This subject will focus on the technical aspects of soil and on the actions farmers can take to effectively and sustainably manage their soil to improve soil productivity and better protect the environment. You will learn about soil available nutrients, pH, and physical and biological properties, as well as explore the application and impact of soil amendments and irrigation. You will also investigate sources, types and rates of fertiliser, the impact of liming and the measurement of soil nutrients, water and erosion.Learning Outcomes:
1. Identify and describe the character and management of soil, and soil amendments.
2. Describe and assess how irrigation can be sustainably managed.
3. Evaluate the impact of soil and water mismanagement on agricultural production.
4. Apply discipline based skills and knowledge in dynamic practice situations.
5. Analyse and communicate core concepts related to discipline knowledge and practice
6. Analyse and evaluate applications of innovative and/or entrepreneurial practice.
7. Develop and communicate understandings related to graduate attributes and transferable skills as adaptive practitioners.
Direct
University of TasmaniaTASCollege of Sciences and Engineering
Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
Bachelor of Applied Science (Agriculture and Business); Associate Degree in Agribusiness; Bachelor of Agricultural ScienceYear 2Soil Formation, Function and Fertility KLA213>80%The unit provides an introduction to the formation of key Tasmanian soil types, their parent materials and their land use potential. Soil fertility and key nutrient cycles (N, P and K), soil morphology and salinity will be examined in lectures, practicals and in the field. Basic soil chemical analysis for key nutrients will be examined. The unit involves three full-day excursions to examine the soils and land use of south-east Tasmania.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
University of TasmaniaTASCollege of Sciences and Engineering
Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
Master of Applied Science (Agricultural Science)PostgraduateSoil Formation, Function and Fertility KLA440>80%Provides Master of Applied Science students with knowledge of soil science. The unit provides knowledge of the formation of key Tasmanian soil types, their parent materials and their land use potential. Soil fertility and key nutrient cycles (N, P and K), soil morphology and salinity will be examined in lectures, practicals and in the field. The practical component provides students with skills and knowledge in soil chemical analysis for key nutrients in soils. The unit involves three full-day excursions to examine the soils and land use of south-east Tasmania. Students are expected to undertake a major research report on this fieldwork and analysis several components in detail. In addition to general course content, students are expected to undertake prescribed reading at an advanced level on recent developments in soil science and to incorporate this knowledge in their theory examination.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
University of TasmaniaTAS College of Sciences and Engineering
Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
Master of Applied Science (Agricultural Science)PostgraduateAgricultural Landscape systems KLA534>80%This unit examines agricultural production systems within the context of sustainable use of soil, land and other natural resources in a changing and/or variable climate. Assessment of soil, land, water and vegetation resources on a catchment and property basis will be covered. Students will develop competency in the assessment of land resources including soil survey, land capability, and land suitability for agricultural and forestry uses. A group mapping project will form a major part of the assessment based on field work and land evaluation for specific uses. Economic analysis of land use change scenarios will also be included.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
University of TasmaniaTASCollege of Sciences and Engineering
School of Engineering
Year 2Engineering Geology and Soil Mechanics ENG22130-80%Soil classification, soil phase relationships, soil compaction, Darcy's law and water seepage through soils, Terzaghi's effective stress principle, and soil consolidation theory and test.Learning Outcomes:
1. Identify earth materials and geological processes in laboratory and/or field on the basis of their characteristic properties.
2. Apply geological and geophysical methods to derive essential information on distributions and properties of the earth materials.
3. Classify engineering soils in a systematic and unified manner according to Australian and international standards.
4. Apply Darcy's law and Terzaghi's effective stress principle to evaluate soil permeability, deformation, and strength properties during the processes of water seepage through soils and soil consolidation.
Indirect
University of TasmaniaTASCollege of Sciences and Engineering
School of Earth Sciences
School of Engineering
Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)(Civil and Environmental Engineering)Year 2Engineering Geology and Soil Mechanics KNE27330-80%Soil phases and properties, characteristics and classification of soils, compaction processes and control, stresses in soils, consolidation and settlement, soil permeability and water movement.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEIndirect
University of Technology SydneyNSWEngineering: Civil and Environmental EngineeringBachelor of Engineering (Civil and environmental engineering)Year 241006 Principles of Soil Science >80%(a) Introduction to soil science and engineering
(b) Soil composition
(c) Soil organisms
(d) Soil water and hydrology
(e) Nutrient cycling
(f) Maintenance of soil productivity
(g) Unsaturated soil
(h) Suction measurement and control
(i) Modelling of unsaturated soil
(j) Thermodynamics of soil systems
(k) Soil pollution and contaminated land
(l) Hazardous waste management
Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
1. Describe the key properties of soil in relation to soil behaviour.
2. Differentiate the common geochemical processes that affect the behaviour of elements.
3. Predict the behaviour of unsaturated soil through measurement of soil properties.
4. Explain the common contaminants in soil and their transfer between soil, water, plants and animals.
5. Discuss and present a management plan for dealing with contaminated soil
Direct
University of Technology SydneyNSWEngineering: Civil and Environmental EngineeringBachelor of Engineering (Civil and environmental engineering)Year 249119 - Problematic Soils and Ground Improvement Techniques>80%(a) Introduction to problematic soils and ground improvement methods
(b) Classification of soft soils, the associated problems, and required site investigation
(c) Design and construction methods of above ground improvement techniques including compaction, preloading, reinforcement using geotextiles and stabilising berms
(d) Design and construction methods of flexible inclusions for ground improvement such as preloading with vertical drains and vacuums, electro osmosis and biotechnical stabilisation.
(e) Design and construction methods of semi-rigid inclusions for ground improvement including dynamic replacement, vibro-flotation, deep soil mixing and mass mixing
(f) Design and construction methods of rigid inclusions for ground improvement including concrete columns, jet grouting and piling.
(g) Design and construction methods of slope stabilisation methods including nailing, reinforced soil and bioengineering.
(h) Design and installation of monitoring devices to observe behaviour of the improved ground
Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
1. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge to identify problematic soils and associated problems.
2. Evaluate performance of the problematic ground subject to structural loads.
3. Analyse and design appropriate ground improvement techniques to satisfy both stability and deformation criteria.
4. Recommend the most appropriate ground improvement construction method and interpret the quality control and monitoring results.
Direct
University of the Sunshine CoastQLDFaculty of Science, Health, Education and EngineeringBachelor of Engineering (Civil) Honours; Bachelor of Engineering /Bachelor of Environmental ScienceYear 2, Sem 2
ENG312 - Soil Mechanics100%Rock and soil identification & classification, phase relations, peculiarities of clay, soil compaction, water flow in soil, stresses under loading, consolidation and settlement, and regional soil composition and behaviour.On successful completion of this course you should be able to:
1. Demonstrate and apply current practical and theoretical knowledge of the principles, key concepts and technologies that relate to soil composition and behaviour in regional and global engineering contexts.
2. Solve theoretical and technical geomechanical engineering problems by: Safely carrying out testing and experiments on soils, collecting data, and dealing with sources of error; Interpreting and analysing laboratory soil test results to identify relationships between these and geomechanical engineering principles; Selecting and using established formulae to present sequenced solutions based on given information.
3. Communicate in writing (tutorial questions, group laboratory report, exam) and orally (presentation).
Direct
University of the Sunshine CoastQLDFaculty of Science, Health, Education and EngineeringBachelor of Engineering (Civil) Honours/ Bachelor of of Environmental Science; Bachelor of Environmental ScienceYear 2, Sem 2ENS224 - Soil Properties, Processes and Rehabilitation100%Pedogenesis, soil sampling, physical, geochemical and biological properties of soils, nutrient cycling in soils, soil laboratory basics and statistical analyses, instrument techniques appropriate for soil analysis, and field work including site assessment and field analyses.On successful completion of this course you should be able to:
1. Demonstrate and apply theoretical and practical knowledge of soil processes and principles to regional and global contexts.
2. Use practical techniques and analytical methods to collect and organise soil and sedimentary information e.g. observation, sampling, laboratory testing, recording.
3. Integrate findings to identify, classify and interpret soils and to assess, evaluate and provide recommendations for their rehabilitation.
4. Communicate findings through scientific reports and seminars.
Direct
University of the Sunshine CoastQLDFaculty of Science, Health, Education and EngineeringBachelor of Engineering (Civil) Honours/ Bachelor of Environmental Science; Bachelor of Environmental Science; Bachelor of Environmental Management; Bachelor of Laws/Bachelor of Environmental management; Bachelor of Primary Education; Diploma in Outdoor Environmental Studies; Diploma in Science and TechnologyYear 1, Sem 1ENS103 - Earth’s Surface Processes20%Topic- soil formation, sampling, lab analysis, sediments geological processes at Earth's surfaceOn successful completion of this course, you should be able to:
1. Demonstrate and apply theoretical and practical knowledge of geological processes and principles to regional and global contexts.
2. Use practical techniques and templates to collect and organise geological information e.g. observation, sampling, laboratory testing, recording.
3. Solve problems in Earth Science by: Analysing and interpreting geological information; Integrating findings to identify rocks and soils, and constructing geological histories supported by evidence, e.g. diagrams, maps, calculations, observation
4. Communicate in scientific writing (workbook, reports)
Indirect
University of WollongongNSWFaculty of Engineering and Information Sciences
School of Civil, Mining and Environmental Engineering
Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) (Civil Engineering)Year 3CIVL361 - Geomechanics30-80%Soils and rocks - differences and similarities; cohesionless and cohesive soils; behaviour of intact and jointed rock masses; weight-volume relationships; particle size distribution; index properties of soils; soil classification; soil compaction and compressibility; mechanical properties of rock. Some topics will be presented in a laboratory environment. Pore water pressures and effective stress concept; permeability of soil and hydraulic properties of rock masses; groundwater flow; seepage theory; flow nets. Shear strength of soils and rock masses, total and effective stress parameters, Mohr-Coulomb criterion; Hoek and Brown failure; sliding on planes of weakness. Application of elastic theory for calculating stresses and displacements within soil or rock masses. Stability analysis of soil and rock slopes; stabilisation methods.On successful completion of this subject, students will be able to:
1. Identify the basic principles and factors controlling the behaviour of soils and rocks.
2. Apply simplified solutions to geotechnical and mining problems including ground control.
3. Apply elastic theory for the determination of stresses for simple geotechnical problems.
4. Identify key assumptions in the development of theories and in the solution of practical problems.
5. Understand and select the appropriate procedures for laboratory testing, and interpret the results in relation to the field practice.
Indirect
Western Sydney UniversityNSWSchool of Science and HealthBachelor of Sustainable Agriculture and food security; Bachelor of Natural Science (Sustainable Agriculture and food security); Bachelor of Science (Environmental Science)Year 1300823 - Soils100%Soil formation and erosion processes, soil physical, chemical and biological properties, and the diversity and classification of soils in the Australian landscape. field description and analysis of soil profiles and properties, soil sampling principles and practice, laboratory measurement of soil physical and chemical properties essential/important for plant growth, soil biology and human and animal remainsNO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
Western Sydney UniversityNSWSchool Of Computing, Engineering And MathematicsBachelor of Engineering Advanced (Honours)(Civil)Year 2300985 - Soil Mechanics>80%This is an introductory unit covering the use of soil, and the water in it, as an engineering material. It will provide students with a basic understanding of the physical and mechanical properties of soils, simple soil testing methods to characterise soil strength and deformation behaviour, and how to apply basic techniques to assess the hydro-mechanical response of soils subjected to loading.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect
Western Sydney UniversityNSWSchool Of ScienceBachelor of Science; Bachelor of Science (Pathway to Teaching Primary/Secondary); Bachelor of Advanced Science; Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts; Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of International Studies; Diploma in Science/Bachelor of ScienceYear 3301273 - Land Degradation and Contamination>80%This unit will examine current interdisciplinary topics on land degradation and contamination in both urban, peri-urban and rural environments. The effects of the various human induced land degradation and contamination processes and pollutants in terrestrial environments will be explored and how impacts can be ameliorated and managed. The focus is on both the science of environmental pollutants and on the remediation strategies currently available. Topics include; basic concepts of soils, study of the processes, common soil pollutants, persistent organic contaminants and pesticides, acidification of soils, quantitative risk assessment, land reclamation, and landfill sites. Field trips to degraded and contaminated sites will be undertaken.NO LEARNING OUTCOMES GIVEN ON WEBSITEDirect

Tafe Courses

Unit of Competency - CodeUnit of Competency - TitleQualificationAQF LevelApplicationPerformance evidenceKnowledge evidenceRating description
AHCSOL504 - Develop and manage a plan to reclaim land affected by salinityDevelop and manage a plan to reclaim land affected by salinity AHC50116 - Diploma of Agriculture 5This unit of competency covers the development and management of a plan to reclaim salt affected land for profitable, sustainable agricultural production. The plan will include the assessment of the area to determine the source of the salt, the level of salinity and the extent of the infestation as well as plan to reduce flooding and the effect of water logging on the soil. The plan will recommend strategies to be used to reclaim the land. The cost of the plan will be calculated. Plant and pasture establishment and management methods will be recommended for saline sites. Management of the reclaimed area is intended to increase production and profitability. The plan will include strategies for prevention of further salinity problems and for community involvement to reduce salinity in the area.
All work must be carried out to comply with workplace procedures, work health and safety legislation and codes, and sustainability practices.
This unit is applicable to a person who has a role in managing the farm. This unit is likely to require consultation with a range of external institutions, groups, government departments and individuals.
No occupational licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements apply to this competency at the time of publication.
Assess land forms and soil types; categories of saline land; take soil and water samples for testing; calculate optimum stocking rate; dentify indicator plant species; assess the level of degradation and damage through salinity; research the latest innovations and management techniques; manage the crop and animal enterprise selected for the farm to utilize the saline area; calculate the costs of the project; calculate benefits of salinity reduction to the enterprise and the property; work with producers and community groups.Salt tolerant plant and pasture species and the management of each; range of methods for reclaiming saline land; strategies to profit from the saline area; value of using natural species and natural systems to improve farm production; benefits of biodiversity on plant production and the animal enterprise; strategic and responsible use of susceptible land; consequences of poor management or removal of vegetation on the landDirect
AHCSOL505 - Monitor and manage soils for production projectsMonitor and manage soils for production projectsAHC51816 - Diploma of Organic Farming; AHC51519 - Diploma of Viticulture; AHC51419 - Diploma of Agribusiness Management; AHC50316 - Diploma of Production Horticulture; AHC50116 - Diploma of Agriculture5This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to research soil information, apply soil testing information to production or management plan, develop and monitor soil amendment practices, review and document soil management plan. The unit applies to individuals who apply specialised skills and knowledge to the monitoring and management of soils for production, and take personal responsibility and exercise autonomy in undertaking complex work. They analyse and synthesise information and analyse, design and communicate solutions to sometimes complex problems. No licensing, legislative or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.Interpreted soil analytical data for the purposes of developing management or production plans; identified particular soil properties that are relevant to the workplace and researched for further enquiry; applied information from soil testing to production or management plan; documented the soil management plan or production plan; developed soil improvement programs; reviewed ongoing soil monitoring programs.Principles and practices for managing soils for production, including: basic soil field tests, interpreting laboratory results, soil chemical properties, soil conservation strategies and sustainable production techniques, soil physical properties, soil sampling techniques, soil types, strategies to ameliorate soil properties.Direct
AHCSOL502 - Manage soils to enhance sustainabilityManage soils to enhance sustainabilityAHC50116 - Diploma of Agriculture 5This unit of competency standard covers the process of assessing soil characteristics, developing and implementing a plan to improve the health of soils, and monitoring and reviewing the results. Soil chemistry, physical chemistry and biology are used in understanding the analysis of soil tests, and the importance of the role of soil biota in soil structure and plant nutrition. Strategies to combine improved production with improved soil biota are considered, and the opportunity to increase biodiversity by strategic use of unproductive land is covered. Healthy soils are the basis of all sustainable land-based production systems. The principles of developing healthy soils involve improving soil structure, increasing soil macronutrients and micronutrients to optimum levels, balancing exchangeable cations, achieving optimum pH, eliminating toxic nutrient levels, and enhancing activity of soil biota. All work must be carried out to comply with workplace procedures, work health and safety legislation and codes, and sustainability practices. This unit is applicable to persons who have a role in managing a land based production business. This unit is likely to require consultation with external experts, such as pasture consultants, fertiliser representatives, contractors, extension officers from State Agricultural Departments, agronomists and producer groups. No occupational licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.Research information on soils; assess soil type; texture and structure in the paddock; diagnose areas with soil problems or potential soil problems; diagnose and interpret soil sample test results and determine priorities for improving soil health; consider and select alternatives including organic products and methods for improving soil health; calculate amounts of nutrients required and prepare a fertiliser program which reflects needs and priorities; record and store information; develop; implement and evaluate a plan to achieve healthy soils through application of soil science; monitor soil health from the application of soil science.Physical, chemical and biological properties of soils; soil biota – types, role in cycling nutrients and improving soil structure; basic chemistry concepts related to interpreting soil test analysis: symbols, elements and compounds; valency, anions, cations; reactions; EC (electrical conductivity), CEC (Cation Exchange Capacity); organic matter; pH and its importance in the availability of nutrients; role of macronutrients and micronutrients in plant nutrition; Concept of limiting factors for production; basic biology: the chemical basis of plants and animals; basic plant structure and function; plant nutrition; water, proteins, sugar, nitrate, lignin content; extent and nature of soil micro organisms; natural cycling of nutrients: carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous and the role of soil biota in the cycles, factors affecting soil biota: moisture, temperature, aeration, nutrient supply, pH, and organic matter; possibility of problems with the use of conventional chemical fertilisers, including acidification contamination of soil and associated water contamination and harm to soil biota; alternative methods to improve soil fertility, including products and use of machinery for aeration and mulching.Direct
AHCIRG509 - Develop an irrigation and drainage management planDevelop an irrigation and drainage management planAHC51619 - Diploma of Irrigation Design; AHC50316 - Diploma of Production Horticulture5This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to compile information and develop an irrigation and drainage management plan.
The unit applies to individuals who apply specialised skills and knowledge to the development of an irrigation and drainage management plan, and take personal responsibility and exercise autonomy in undertaking complex work. They analyse and synthesise information and analyse, design and communicate solutions to sometimes complex problems.
No licensing, legislative or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Compiled and analysed complex information; used a range of irrigation and information management software; interpreted statistical data and measurements; developed plans and reports; developed and implemented relevant workplace health and safety and environmental procedures; identified adverse environmental impacts of irrigation system activities and recommended appropriate remedial action.Workplace policies and procedures relevant to irrigation and drainage management planning; measuring and monitoring procedures; readily available water; water table and salinity; soil, plant and water relationships; computerised irrigation systems, methods and techniques of irrigation; environmental impacts of irrigation systems using water from any ground or underground source; irrigation system options.Indirect
AHCPCM505 - Conduct environment and food safety risk assessment of plant nutrition and soil fertility programsConduct environment and food safety risk assessment of plant nutrition and soil fertility programsAHC50416 - Diploma of Horticulture; AHC50316 - Diploma of Production Horticulture; AHC50116 - Diploma of Agriculture5This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to conduct an environment and food safety risk assessment on established or developing plant nutrition and soil fertility programs develop a nutrient management plan.
It applies to individuals who analyse information and exercise judgement to complete a range of advanced skilled activities and demonstrate deep knowledge in a specific technical area. They have accountability for the work of others and analyse, design and communicate solutions to a range of complex problems. All work is carried out to comply with workplace procedures.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Research, identify and document community, government and agricultural industry information, concerns and requirements in relation to fertiliser and soil ameliorant use and environmental stewardship; Research, identify and document information and standards relating to transporting, handling, storing and applying fertilisers and soil ameliorants; identify and evaluate probability and severity of identified environmental risks associated with plant nutrition and soil fertility programs; calculate areas, ratios, proportions and application rates; liaise with managers and landowners, local and national organisations; develop a nutrient management plan; monitor effectiveness of plant nutrition and soil fertility management decisions over time; identify opportunities to improve efficiency and effectiveness of plant nutrition and soil fertility program; estimate treatment and product requirements, material sizes and quantities
Principles and practices of food safety risk assessment; environmental implications for environment of soil amendment and fertiliser use, that may include nutrient mining, run-off, nutrient loading of soil and water, toxicity, noise and dust, food safety; issues relating to the use of fertilisers and soil ameliorants; law of the minimum and importance of nutrient interactions; methods and pathways of nutrient uptake by plants and loss from soil; nutrient cycling and its practical relevance to specific plants and soils encountered in local area, including role of soil biology; nutrients required by plants grown within enterprise and effects of nutrient deficiency and toxicity on individual plant species and varieties; relationship between soil characteristics and the availability of nutrients, including macro and micro elements, to plants; single nutrient and complete fertiliser products encountered in local area, including physical attributes, nutrient analysis, solubility, salt index, application rates and costs, and appropriate application techniques and equipment; soil amendments commonly used to treat local soil problems; soil and water sampling techniques to adapt activities and instructions to a range of environmental contexts; techniques for interpreting laboratory results and making fertiliser and amendment recommendations; techniques to assess effects of fertiliser and amendment recommendations on soil, plants and water.Indirect
AHCSAW502 - Plan erosion and sediment control measuresPlan erosion and sediment control measures AHC52116- Diploma of Permaculture; AHC51116- Diploma of Conservation and Land Management5This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to develop erosion and sediment control plans.
This unit applies to individuals who take personal responsibility and exercise autonomy in undertaking complex work. They analyse, design and communicate solutions to sometimes complex problems.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Develop a plan for erosion and sediment control measures that meets regulatory requirements and industry standards; establish suitability of development proposal to location and environment; prepare reports on erosion and sediment control plans to enterprise standards; develop erosion and sediment control measures consistent with industry principles and selection criteria; prepare an erosion and sediment control plan to industry standards and to comply with relevant regulatory planning authorityApplication of relevant environmental, planning and groundwater legislation in erosion and sediment control work; planning process for erosion and sediment control; erosion control and design principles: soils and soil formation, levels and levelling, earthmoving principles, total catchment issues, how to manage peak water flows, subsurface and surface drainage principles and systems; permits or consents potentially required for developing erosion and sediment control structures; environmental issues related to erosion and sediment; awareness of the limitations of design aids provided for industry; work health and safety implications of implementing plans.Indirect
AHCSOL503 - Manage erosion and sediment controlManage erosion and sediment control AHC50116- Diploma of Agriculture5This unit of competency covers the development and implementation of a plan to address existing erosion problems and to prevent further erosion and sediment problems. The development of the plan will address the relevant legislation and issues associated with land disturbing projects. It requires the ability to identify and establish suitable strategies to develop, implement and monitor an erosion and sediment strategy and manage the project from implementation through to completion to achieve required outcomes.
Planning and managing erosion and sediment control measures requires a knowledge of relevant environmental, planning and ground water legislation, erosion and sediment control techniques, setting work specifications and objectives for the property or catchment system.
This unit is applicable to persons who have a role in the managing of the following land based business: Agricultural related industries, Production Horticulture, Agro- Forestry
Natural resource management, Roadside management and civil construction, Extractive mining industries
All work must be carried out to comply with workplace procedures, work health and safety legislation and codes, and sustainability practices.
This unit will require consultation with external experts such as land management consultants, planning authorities, Catchment Management Authority, Landcare, State and Federal Government Departments who provide advice, contractors, neighbours and other interested groups.
No occupational licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Identify appropriate erosion and sediment control strategy methods; prepare plans and reports on erosion and sediment control plans; develop an erosion and sediment control plan; communicate and collaborate effectively with all stakeholders for planning and conflict resolution; implement work health and safety control measures at site work operations; monitor, evaluate and analyse effectiveness of erosion and sediment plan outcomes; organise required resources and key stakeholdersEnvironment sustainability as a whole farm system approach; environmental issues with regard to water catchment, ecosystems, habitats and waste minimisation; relevant environmental, planning and groundwater legislation including licences and permits to implement erosion and sediment control activities; erosion control and design principles; planning processes for erosion and sediment control; project and risk management techniques and tools for the management of erosion and sediment control; soils and soil formation; earthmoving principles,
- work health and safety obligations and "Duty of Care"; subsurface and surface drainage principles and systems.
Indirect
AHCORG503 - Design and document an organic farm landscapeDesign and document an organic farm landscapeAHC51816 -Diploma of Organic Farming5This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to design and document an organic farm landscape that will be used as the basis for an organic farm enterprise.
All work must be carried out to comply with workplace procedures, work health and safety, animal welfare and biosecurity legislation and codes, and sustainability practices.
This unit applies to individuals who take responsibility for their own work and for the quality of the work of others within know parameters and use discretion and judgment in the selection, allocation and use of available resources.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Source and interpret legislative requirements industry standards and codes of practice; identify compliant work practices and procedures; conduct an audit of the natural resources and infrastructure of the property; identify physical and biological characteristics and landscape features of the property; develop farm soil map and determine land capability; develop an organic landscape plan using appropriate development tools; revise a draft plan and document the final organic landscape plan.Applicable legislative documents and codes of practice relevant to farm landscape planning; landscape types; habitat and plant communities on farm; relationship between land shape and soil type; soil types; different categories of cultural sites; organic certification requirements; landscape hydrology; landscapes for agro-ecosystems; native habitat requirements; the requirements of the organic standard and agro-ecological principles.Partial
AHCORG507 - Develop an organic or biodynamic management planDevelop an organic or biodynamic management planAHC52116- Diploma of Permaculture; AHC51816- Diploma of Organic Farming; AHC51519- Diploma of Viticulture; AHC50316- Diploma of Production Horticulture; AHC50116- Diploma of Agriculture5This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to locate and access assistance, and design an organic management plan (OMP) or biodynamic management plan (BMP), develop soil fertility plan and soil, weed, integrated pest and disease, animal health and environmental sub-plan's and integrate and finalise the OMP or BMP.
The unit applies to individuals who apply specialised skills and knowledge to the development of an OMP or BMP and take personal responsibility and exercise autonomy in undertaking complex work. They analyse and synthesise information and demonstrate deep knowledge in a specific technical area. They analyse, design and communicate solutions to sometimes complex problems.
All work must be carried out to comply with workplace procedures, health and safety in the workplace requirements, animal welfare and legislative and regulatory requirements, organic standards, sustainability and biosecurity practices.
No licensing, legislative or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Identified and developed required components of an organic management plan (OMP) or biodynamic management plan (BMP) for a property; identified and used interrelationships between soil, plant, animal health and environmental management and farming system's resilience when developing plan; identified options for prevention and treatment of risks; applied appropriate regional catchment targets; documented the plan in compliance with certification standard requirements.Principles of organic agriculture, especially: fundamental role of soil health, principles of sustainable production, requirements and components of an OMP and BMP, organic and biodynamic certification standard requirements.Partial
AHCCFP401 - Increase soil organic carbon using land management practicesIncrease soil organic carbon using land management practicesAHC41019 - Certificate IV in Agribusiness4This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to identify the benefits of increasing soil organic carbon for soil condition or soil health, and to implement a project to increase soil carbon.
The unit applies to individuals who participate in farming and/or land management activities. It may lead to participation in an approved carbon farming project to generate carbon credits.
No licensing, legislative or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Identified the benefits and co-benefits of increasing carbon in soil; planned and implemented a project to increase soil organic matter in soil.How land use and management practices impact on soil health; physical, chemical and biological properties of healthy soil; opportunities presented by degraded soil (or soil that has less soil carbon than normally expected under standard, normal or common land management practices for the local area); land management practices that have the potential to increase soil health and agricultural productivity, dependent on local climate and soil type, including: (no till or conservation tillage and controlled traffic, cover crops pasture cropping, crop rotation (depending on rotation and crop), perennial-based systems integrated pest management and weed management, managed movement of water; co-benefits of increased carbon in soil, including: (environmental benefits: improved biodiversity above and below ground, improved air, water and soil quality, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, improved movement of water across landscape, reduced salinity/erosion/acidification/compaction, increased resilience to drought, and increased land versatility social benefits: including increased resilience to drought, more stable and diverse income, healthier people and communities, and improved succession planning economic benefits: including potential for diversified income streams, increased farm productivity, access to finance, increased land versatility, new skills and career development, and less income spent on supplements and fertilisers); reasons for measuring soil organic carbon, including as a measure of soil health and as an estimate of stocks of soil organic carbon for carbon trading; informal methods for measuring soil carbon, including percentage tests across a paddock; using baseline measurements to estimate potential additional soil carbon; approved methods for soil-based carbon farming projects, - soil quality calculators at soilquality.org.au.Direct
AHCORG403 - Manage organic soil improvementManage organic soil improvementAHC52116- Diploma of Permaculture; AHC51816- Diploma of Organic Farming; AHC50116- Diploma of Agriculture; AHC42116- Certificate IV in Permaculture; AHC41616- Certificate IV in Organic Farming; AHC40416- Certificate IV in Horticulture; AHC40316- Certificate IV in Production Horticulture; AHC40116- Certificate IV in Agriculture4This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to manage organic soil improvement. All work must be carried out to comply with workplace procedures, work health and safety, animal welfare and biosecurity legislation and codes, and sustainability practices. This unit applies to managers on farms that are managed according to the principles of organic agriculture. Work is likely to be done independently and according to the requirements of the National Standard for Organic and Biodynamic Produce. All work is done in an environmentally appropriate manner and according to workplace information, principles of organic agriculture and/or agro-ecology, work health and safety requirements and enterprise guidelines. This unit applies to individuals who take responsibility for their own work and for the quality of the work of others within know parameters and use discretion and judgment in the selection, allocation and use of available resources. No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.Implement principles of organic agriculture and agroecology,
- implement knowledge of interrelationships between soil fertility, animals, plants, pests and diseases,
- devise and implement a soil improvement plan to correct imbalances and maintain soil fertility,
- sample soils and analyse soil test results for a range of indicators of soil fertility; work with natural processes and allowable inputs to improve and maintain soil fertility; apply enterprise work health and safety policies and guidelines; implement enterprise environmental sustainability practices
Availability, use and definition of organic fertilisers; structural properties of soils; factors contributing to soil acidity, sodicity and salinity; factors promoting soil and plant water-holding capacity; importance of soil biological activity; major nutrient elements and their role in plant growth; methods and inputs that can be used to correct imbalances and maintain soil fertility; principles of organic agriculture; processes and practices that impact on soil structure, biological activity, water-holding capacity and weed patterns; processes of aggregate and colloid formation; range of soil analyses available and principles of each; relationship between soil structure, water holding capacity and nutrient availability; role of organic matter, humus and micro-organisms; role of livestock in enhancing soil fertility; role of macro and micro-elements in soil and plants; role of weeds; significance of levels and balance of soil fertility indicators; soil food chains and food webs; soil textural types and determinants; when and how to take soil samples to test for indicators of soil fertility; principles, practices and inputs allowable under the National Standard for Organic and Biodynamic Produce.Direct
AHCSOL402 - Develop a soil use map for a propertyDevelop a soil use map for a propertyAHC51619- Diploma of Irrigation Design; AHC42116- Certificate IV in Permaculture; AHC41616- Certificate IV in Organic Farming; AHC41416- Certificate IV in Seed Production; AHC40316- Certificate IV in Production Horticulture; AHC40116- Certificate IV in Agriculture4This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to develop a soil use map for a property.
This unit applies to individuals who analyse information and exercise judgement to complete a range of advanced skilled activities and demonstrate deep knowledge in a specific technical area. They have accountability for the work of others and analyse, design and communicate solutions to a range of complex problems. All work is carried out to comply with workplace procedures.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Analyse survey results; determine soil characteristics; identify adverse environmental impact of irrigation activities and take appropriate action; interpret soil analyses results; perform a soil survey; plot topography and soil survey data on a property mapPrinciples and practices for developing soil use maps; environmental impacts of irrigation; using water from any ground or underground source; methods and techniques of soil sampling; nutrient availability in soils; physical and chemical properties of soils; readily available water; soil analyses results; soil quality factors; soil types and profiles; soil water retention testing techniques; water table and salinity.Direct
AHCSOL401 - Sample soils and interpret resultsSample soils and interpret resultsRGR30419- Certificate III in Racing Services; FBP30918- Certificate III in Wine Industry Operations; AHC42016- Certificate IV in Landscape; AHC41616- Certificate IV in Organic Farming; AHC41416- Certificate IV in Seed Production; AHC41119- Certificate IV in Irrigation Management; AHC41116- Certificate IV in Irrigation; AHC40916- Certificate IV in Conservation and Land Management; AHC40816- Certificate IV in Sports Turf Management; AHC40516- Certificate IV in Parks and Gardens; AHC40416- Certificate IV in Horticulture; AHC40316- Certificate IV in Production Horticulture; AHC40116- Certificate IV in Agriculture; AHC31716- Certificate III in Natural Area Restoration; AHC31616- Certificate III in Lands, Parks and Wildlife; AHC31319- Certificate III in Sports Turf Management; AHC31316- Certificate III in Sports Turf Management; AHC31116- Certificate III in Production Nursery; AHC30116- Certificate III in Agriculture4This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to take a soil sample and interpret the test results.
This unit applies to individuals whose job role includes undertaking soil or growing media sampling and interpreting the results as a foundation for further horticultural operations such as nutrition programs and irrigation scheduling.
This unit applies to individuals who analyse information and exercise judgement to complete a range of advanced skilled activities and demonstrate deep knowledge in a specific technical area. They have accountability for the work of others and analyse, design and communicate solutions to a range of complex problems. All work is carried out to comply with workplace procedures.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Collect soil and media samples using appropriate sampling methodology; file and record analytic results for future use; implement a nutrient and nutrition program; prepare soil and media; samples for dispatch to soil analysis laboratory; receive and interpret analytic results.Principles and practices of soils sampling: environmental implications associated with soil surveying activities and the application of analytical results, practical understanding of the range of sample collection, testing and analytical methods that may be used to perform soil surveys, and the association of surveying methods with site conditions, environmental implications and intended horticultural use of the surveyed site, soil ameliorants and soil improvement techniques for addressing site limitations identified through surveying; the capacity of soils to provide water to plants; the importance of organic matter in soil in relation to the intended horticultural use; the physical and chemical properties of soils in relation to their ability to support specified horticultural production.Direct
AHCIRG441 - Evaluate water supply for irrigationEvaluate water supply for irrigationAHC41416- Certificate IV in Seed Production; AHC41119- Certificate IV in Irrigation Management4This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to determine irrigation water needs, assess water quality of water source, determine cost and availability of alternative water sources and complete water sourcing or acquisition arrangements.
The unit applies to individuals who apply specialised skills and knowledge to evaluate water supply for irrigation. This includes applying and communicating non-routine technical solutions to predictable and unpredictable problems.
No licensing, legislative or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Estimated the irrigation requirements of plants; calculated water losses in an irrigation system; interpreted results for electrical conductivity of irrigation water; taken water samples; calculated capital and operating expenditure for a water supply system; compared costs for different water sources.Plant water requirements in terms of water quality and frequency of supply; salinity and composition impacts on soil structure and plant growth; soils and water, soil moisture retention and movement, plant root zones and development, infiltration and leaching; climatic factors in irrigation development, rainfall, evaporation, evapotranspiration and hydrology; irrigation drainage, seepage, surface and subsurface drainage systems; irrigation scheduling, soil moisture measurement; efficiency of irrigation systems and long-term viability; management planning and operation of water allocations; cost benefit analysis; capital and operating expenditure calculations to source water; operations and maintenance requirements; legislation relevant to the supply of water for irrigation.Indirect
AHCMER406 - Provide information on fertilisers and soil ameliorantsProvide information on fertilisers and soil ameliorantsAHC40116 - Certificate IV in Agriculture4This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to provide information on fertilisers and soil ameliorants. All work must be carried out to comply with workplace procedures, work health and safety legislation and codes, and sustainability practices.
This unit applies to employees in a sales role in an agricultural or horticultural support enterprise who provide information on fertilisers, soil ameliorants and related environmental information to primary producers.
This unit applies to individuals who take responsibility for their own work and provide and communicate solutions to a range of predictable and sometimes unpredictable problems.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Take soil, plant tissue and water samples; use and explain use of nutrient management tools; provide information on the relationship between soil types, water, crops, fertiliser and soil ameliorant use; follow enterprise work health and safety policies; follow enterprise biosecurity and sustainability policies.Crop nutrient requirements - both macro and micro nutrients; effect of soil ameliorants in dispersion and adjustment for acidity or alkalinity (pH); fertiliser and soil ameliorant application methods, including timing and frequency of fertiliser and soil ameliorant application to minimise losses; fertiliser and soil ameliorants availability and relative costs; industry production regimes and fertiliser practices; sources of technical information; major nutrient management risks of leach, run-off, load, blow, mine and how these impact on the environment; nutrient management advisory tools and processes used by advisers in making a crop nutrition recommendation; organisational work health and safety and environmental procedures, practices and policies in operating sampling equipment, packaging and dispatch procedures for samples; physical, chemical and biological properties related to a healthy soil and environment; sampling tools and methods, including soil, plant tissue and water tests; yield monitoring; and electrical conductivity survey; impact of climate on soil productivity; environmental impacts including soil structural decline, fertility decline, acidification and salinity, erosion, loss of organic matter, water quality, fertiliser and soil ameliorant impurities, and greenhouse gas emissions; work health and safety legislation; use, transport, handling and storage requirements of fertiliser and soil ameliorants in terms of legislation, codes of practice, environmental stewardship and human safety.Indirect
AHCPCM402 - Develop a soil health and plant nutrition programDevelop a soil health and plant nutrition programAHC51019- Diploma of Sports Turf Management; AHC41916- Certificate IV in Arboriculture; AHC40816- Certificate IV in Sports Turf Management; AHC40716- Certificate IV in Retail Nursery; AHC40616- Certificate IV in Production Nursery; AHC40516- Certificate IV in Parks and Gardens; AHC40416- Certificate IV in Horticulture; AHC40316- Certificate IV in Production Horticulture; AHC40219- Certificate IV in Protected Horticulture; AHC40116- Certificate IV in Agriculture4This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to develop a soil health and plant nutrition program.
It applies to individuals who analyse information and exercise judgement to complete a range of advanced skilled activities and demonstrate deep knowledge in a specific technical area. They have accountability for the work of others and analyse, design and communicate solutions to a range of complex problems. All work is carried out to comply with workplace procedures.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Access and analyse information on regional site factors; assess the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of soils; assess the physical, nutritional and health requirements of plants; develop a soil, plant and water testing program; develop a program to achieve appropriate soil conditions and nutrient availability for plant growth, incorporating a soil heath and plant nutrition plan; research and analyse findings on plant nutritional requirements, nutrients available from soils and other growth media, and environmental implications of program; select suitable management practices, soil amendments, additives and fertilisers.Principles and practices of soil health and plant nutrition; characteristics of soil and other growth media types, uses and additives to enhance available nutrition for specific plants; main simple and compound fertiliser products available to enterprise, including analysis, solubility, salt index, application rates and costs, methods of nutrient uptake by plants and favourable conditions for effective uptake to occur; nutrients and water required by plants grown within enterprise and effects of nutrient deficiency and toxicity on individual plant species and varieties; visual and other symptoms of nutrient deficiency and toxicity on individual plant species and varieties; organic matter, pest and disease, and nutrient interactions in soil and nutrient cycling,
- environmental issues associated with selecting nutritional materials; implementing a plant nutrition program; legislation compliance requirements and ensuring minimal impact on environment; the following types of relationships between soil and growth media characteristics and availability of nutrients to plants: macro and micro elements; the following types of site evaluation techniques: methods of sampling and analysing soils and other growth media, soil amendments commonly required to treat soil problems experienced by enterprise.
Indirect
AHCSOL403 - Prepare acid sulphate soil management plansPrepare acid sulphate soil management plansAHC40916- Certificate IV in Conservation and Land Management; AHC40116- Certificate IV in Agriculture4This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to develop management plans that address the relevant legislation and issues associated with land and ground water disturbing activities for acid sulphate soil (ASS).
This unit applies to individuals who analyse information and exercise judgement to complete a range of advanced skilled activities and demonstrate deep knowledge in a specific technical area. They have accountability for the work of others and analyse, design and communicate solutions to a range of complex problems. All work is carried out to comply with workplace procedures.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Collect and use field and test data to identify strategies to remediate and manage the site; complete a desktop assessment of the land for actual and potential ASS risk based on current and proposed land use, site data and compliance issues; document an ASS management plan and effectively communicate it to the landowner, relevant consent authority and contractors; support implementation of ASS management plan by reports on materials management and remediation and site rehabilitation.Principles and practices for preparing acid sulphate soil management plans: ASS assessment tools, earthmoving principles, environmental impact issues, environmental impacts of ASS, environmental plans, strategies and options for management and remediation, managing acid leachate water flows, planning process for remediation and management plans, principles of duty of care and due diligence, relevant environmental, planning and groundwater legislation, soils and soil chemistry; subsurface and surface drainage principles and systems, total catchment issues.Indirect
AHCSOL404 - Supervise acid sulphate soil remediation and management projectsSupervise acid sulphate soil remediation and management projectsAHC40916- Certificate IV in Conservation and Land Management; AHC40116- Certificate IV in Agriculture4This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to supervise acid sulphate soil (ASS) remediation and management projects.
This unit applies to individuals who analyse information and exercise judgement to complete a range of advanced skilled activities and demonstrate deep knowledge in a specific technical area. They have accountability for the work of others and analyse, design and communicate solutions to a range of complex problems. All work is carried out to comply with workplace procedures.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Review Acid Sulphate Soil (ASS) management plan and plan the work; document and communicate objectives of the project, as well as environmental and work health and safety issues, to stakeholders and individual contractors; carry out the works identified in the (ASS) management plan in compliance with regulatory requirements and work specifications; monitor completed works and carry out modifications in consultation with the approved plan provider where necessary.Principles and practices of acid sulphate soil remediation: Acid Sulphate Soil (ASS) and soil chemistry, equipment most suited to ASS site remediation and management, Quality Assurance systems, processes and practices, relevant environmental, planning and groundwater legislation, subsurface and surface drainage principles and systems.Indirect
AHCIRG339 - Monitor soils under irrigationMonitor soils under irrigationAHC32419 - Certificate III in Irrigation Technology3This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to assess physical and moisture properties of soil, monitor soil chemical properties, assess soil health and plant growth under irrigation, and implement strategies to optimise irrigation on the soil plant growing environment.
The unit applies to individuals who monitor soils under irrigation under broad direction and take responsibility for their own work.
No licensing, legislative or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Conducted soil structure and texture assessment; used soil moisture monitoring equipment; calculated moisture holding capacity of plants, including readily available water (RAW); applied the results of soil testing to assessing soil properties; assessed the erosion potential of the irrigated soil, adjusted watering practices to meet plant needs.Soil structure and texture; effect of dispersible soils under irrigation;- critical measures for moisture availability; adverse environmental impacts of irrigated plant production; field capacity; signs of moisture stress & nutrient deficiency in plants; wilting point; soil moisture definitions and calculations; RAW calculations; interpreting salinity, sodicity and pH tests; soil moisture monitoring procedures; types of erosion.Direct
AHCPER319 - Test, improve and maintain healthy soil in a permaculture systemTest, improve and maintain healthy soil in a permaculture systemAHC33816- Certificate III in Permaculture3This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to test, improve and maintain healthy soil in a permaculture system. It requires knowledge of soils and their components, testing methods, nutrient action and soil improvement systems.
All work is carried out to comply with workplace procedures.
This unit applies to individuals who analyse information and exercise judgement to complete a range of advanced skilled activities and demonstrate deep knowledge in a specific technical area. They have accountability for the work of others and analyse, design and communicate solutions to a range of complex problems.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Take soil samples; test soils; analyse soil improvement requirements; implement soil improvement plan according to permaculture guidelines; maintain soil healthPermaculture principles and practices related to soil health and plant nutrition: working with natural soils rather than importing soil, soil as an ecosystem, soil as biomass and carbon capture and storage; Principles of sustainable horticultural practices; how to read a laboratory soil test; soil testing techniques, such as: jar test for soil structure, ribbon test and ball test for soil texture, infiltration or permeability test, pH testing, compaction test, non-wetting soil test, air-filled porosity test, worm count, microscopic biota in soils; plant nutrient uptake and mineral action; soil chemistry; science of composting; fungal and bacterial action and mulches appropriate to different plants; additives to improve soils, such as: (compost and worm castings compost teas, biochar, green manures, organic mulch, manures/animal bedding materials, leaf mould, plantings – green manures, nurse plants, companion planting, chop and drop, nutrient trapping systems, greywater use, organically certified products, amendments that may include rock dust, gypsum, dolomite, lime, zircon, sulphur and other minerals); plant growth and development; soil life, including microscopic life; methods of waste disposal causing minimal impact on the environment; the effects of conventional agricultural chemicals on soils and soil ecosystems.Direct
AHCSOL304 - Implement soil improvements for garden and turf areasImplement soil improvements for garden and turf areasAHC31319- Certificate III in Sports Turf Management; AHC31016- Certificate III in Parks and Gardens 3This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to collect and test soil samples for their physical and chemical characteristics and take corrective action to improve the soil for garden beds and turf areas.
The unit applies to individuals who carry out soil improvements under general direction and take responsibility for their own work. They use discretion and judgement in the selection, allocation and use of available resources and for solving problems.
No licensing, legislative or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Determined the purpose for collecting and testing soil samples; collected representative soil samples for testing and packaged and labelled them according to workplace and laboratory requirements; collected samples of at least three different soil types, and: (conducted tests safely to determine soil physical and chemical properties according to industry standards, assessed test results and prepared soil improvement plan to meet the requirements and conditions required for the plant species to be cultivated); There must also be evidence that, on at least one occasion, the individual has, according to workplace procedures: (selected tools, materials and equipment required for implementing soil improvement plan, calibrated equipment prior to application of soil improvement materials, adjusted physical and chemical properties according to cultural requirements of the plants to be grown, maintained records and reported soil test outcomes).Physical properties of soils and media and methods for testing, including: colour, organic matter, texture tests using field and sieve analysis techniques, structure, air filled porosity, moisture holding capacity, soil bulk density, infiltration rate and drainage properties, including hydraulic conductivity, perched water tables, wettability; chemical properties of soils and media, and methods for testing, including: pH using colorimetric and pH meters, salinity, total dissolved salts and electrical conductivity, types of nutrient tests and their purpose; soil sampling, collecting and testing procedures, including: tools and equipment required, procedures for testing, procedures for sampling, securing, packaging and labelling; soil and media improvement strategies for physical and chemical characteristics, including: products and processes for improving soil and media physical condition, soil ameliorants and improvement techniques, bio-stimulants, organic matter and effect on soil and media, water holding capacity and readily available water, including wetting agents and penetrants, soil biological organisms and their impact, effect of pH, salinity and fertilisers on availability of nutrients, soil profile both natural and constructed, Australian standards AS4454:2012 Composts, soil conditioners and mulches, and AS4419:2018 Soils for landscaping and garden use; assessment and interpretation of soil test results for physical and chemical properties and their relationship to cultivated plants relevant to workplace; basic mathematics for calculating rates of application of soil additives, water holding capacity, air filled porosity and measuring and weighing materials to perform accurate soil tests; using test results to determine soil improvements; safe field and laboratory practices when collecting and testing soils and media; record keeping and reporting procedures for soil collecting, testing and planning procedures.Direct
AHCPCM301 - Implement a plant nutrition programImplement a plant nutrition program FBP30918- Certificate III in Wine Industry Operations; AHC33719- Certificate III in Protected Horticulture; AHC33416- Certificate III in Seed Production; AHC33216- Certificate III in Floriculture; AHC32516- Certificate III in Aboriginal Sites Work; AHC31516- Certificate III in Indigenous Land Management; AHC31319- Certificate III in Sports Turf Management; AHC31316- Certificate III in Sports Turf Management; AHC31216- Certificate III in Retail Nursery; AHC31116- Certificate III in Production Nursery; AHC31016- Certificate III in Parks and Gardens; AHC30716- Certificate III in Horticulture; AHC30216- Certificate III in Agriculture (Dairy Production); AHC30116- Certificate III in Agriculture3Identify goals, target site; soils and plants for implementing the program; identify materials and their supply source, monitor soil pH in the implementation site; identify appropriate products and application methods appropriate to; implementing nutrition program; estimate treatment and product requirements; material sizes and quantities; conduct a site hazard identification and risk control assessment; determine nutritional problems in plants; plant nutrition program specifications; apply specific products at appropriate rates and record their application; select, check and calibrate tools; equipment and machineryPrinciples and practices of plant nutrition, botany and plant physiology; methods of nutrient uptake by plants; nutrient cycling and its practical relevance to the specific plants and soils; nutrients required by plants grown within the enterprise; soil ameliorants commonly required to treat the soil problems experienced by the enterprise; the effects of nutrient deficiency and toxicity on plant species and varieties; the environmental implications of soil ameliorant and fertiliser use; the main simple and compound fertiliser products available to the enterprise including analysis, solubility, salt index, application rates and costs; the relationship between soil characteristics and the availability of nutrients.Indirect
AHCWRK307 - Develop and apply fertiliser and soil ameliorant product knowledgeDevelop and apply fertiliser and soil ameliorant product knowledgeAHC32716 - Certificate III in Rural Merchandising3This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to develop and apply fertiliser and soil ameliorant product knowledge.
The unit applies to contractors and employees working in a number of roles within the fertiliser and soil ameliorant industry, including those involved in fertiliser and soil ameliorant spreading or application, warehousing, wholesale and retail sales and transport and the storage of fertilisers and soil ameliorants. Work is carried out to comply with industry codes of practice, quality assurance requirements, environmental best practices and relevant legislative requirements.
This unit applies to individuals who work under broad direction and take responsibility for their own work including limited responsibility for the work of others. They use discretion and judgement in the selection and use of available resources.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Identify fertiliser and soil ameliorant products using information about their characteristics; provide information to customers about fertiliser and soil ameliorant products; refer customers to other appropriate sources of information about products; work safely with products; use industry standard terminology.Characteristics and key label components (including product analysis, impurities and warnings) of the range of fertiliser and soil ameliorants sold or handled in the workplace; key environmental, work health and safety and food safety risks associated with the use, spreading, storage, handling and transport of fertilisers and soil ameliorants.Indirect
Implement a soil management programFBP30918 - Certificate III in Wine Industry Operations3This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to monitor soil requirements and implement and evaluate a soil management program.
The unit applies to individuals who carry out workplace procedures in consultation with the manager in completing tasks associated with implementing a soil management program.
All work must be carried out to comply with workplace procedures, according to state/territory health and safety, and food safety regulations, legislation and standards that apply to the workplace.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Accessing workplace information to identify vineyard soil requirements; ensuring use of workplace health and safety procedures; selecting and fitting personal protective equipment; determining requirements for vineyard soil management and making recommendations for approval; coordinating resources and activities to implement soil management program; monitoring and identifying non-conformances with the effectiveness of soil management program; completing workplace records.Workplace health and safety hazards and controls including selecting, fitting and using appropriate personal protective equipment; soil management techniques and their effect on soil, vine growth, cropping levels and wine quality: ideal soil environment for vines plus specific requirements of grapes grown, visual signs of vine nutrient deficiencies, sampling techniques and procedures, routine testing techniques and procedures, interpretation of routine tests; procedures for monitoring the vineyard and interpreting the results to identify vineyard soil management requirements, including: soil moisture content, water table level, weed population, nutrient levels in plant and soil, signs of vine nutrient deficiencies, climatic conditions, cover crop practices, soil analyses including pH and salinity, evidence of hard pans, soil texture, vine root distribution, irrigation water quality, erosion risk, soil management history, growth of mid-row sward; procedures for planning and implementing the soil management program: resources, including operators with appropriate skills, equipment availability and capability, materials and chemicals, maintenance programs and supplies, specific needs of individual blocks, application rates for soil addition, environmental conditions; procedures for monitoring soil management activities: operator performance, operating conditions, operating results, material supplies equipment performance; how to identify, rectify and report environmental non-conformance; procedures and responsibility for reporting non-conformance.Indirect
Comply with soil and water protectionFWP30216- Certificate III in Harvesting and Haulage; FWP30116- Certificate III in Forest Growing and Management3This unit of competency describes the outcomes required to protect soil, water and water catchments from erosion, sediment and other pollutants.
The unit applies to those who put in place erosion, sediment control and pollution prevention measures in a variety of work settings, including: a forest, horticultural, domestic, local council or emergency services environment.
The unit applies to Forestry technician, Nursery technician, Supervisor (Forestry operations), Tree planter, Silviculturist, Arboriculture technician, Mobile equipment operator
No licensing, legislative, regulatory, or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Effectively comply with soil and water protection requirements; following regulatory or local government ordinance requirements, codes of practice, WHS and environmental policies for the protection of soil, water and water catchments; follow organisational policies and procedures, relevant to the protection of soil, water and water catchments; implement effective erosion mitigation, sediment and pollutant control, surface and ground water protection measures; monitor and maintain erosion mitigation and sediment control processes and water catchment protection measures; use effective communication and safe work practices; identifying and reporting non-compliant work practices; complete relevant workplace documentation.Regulations, standards, codes of practice and established safe practices for soil and water protection procedures, including the following applicable regulations from all levels of government that affect forest operations in relation to soil and water protection including: regional forest agreements, relevant codes of practice, forest operational plans; organisational and site standards, requirements, policies and procedures relevant to soil and water protection; techniques and measures relevant to erosion mitigation including the majority of the following:
walk-over techniques, minimal disturbance techniques, crown and cross fall drainage, cross bank drainage, relief, culverts on roads, mitre and table drains on roads, armouring/gravelling of roads, crossing and draining surfaces, batter stabilisation, contour banks and channels, gabions, sediment basins, riparian buffer zones, outlet protection structures, revegetation; factors that are likely to influence soil and water protection measures including: track and road maintenance, drainage structures, setting of contour lines, slope measurement techniques, boundaries and survey markers, site preparation techniques, site cultivation techniques, disposal of logging waste materials, windrowing placement and techniques, tree selection and felling techniques, log dump locations and techniques, log extraction and haulage techniques, clearing techniques; environmental features that can be adversely effected if soil erosion occurs, or if inundated with sediment of other pollutants including the majority of the following: trees, understorey and other vegetation, drainage lines and drainage depressions, water course, creeks and rivers, lakes, swamps and wetlands, aquatic species, steep slopes, caves, historic and cultural heritage sites, road and water supply infrastructure, Other pollution control measures including: fuel containment barriers, chemical spillage barriers, containment and removal of waste, including rubbish litter and human waste, risks and hazard identification relevant to soil and water protection, established communication channels and protocols, procedures for recording and reporting workplace information.
Indirect
AHCMOM306 - Ground spread fertiliser and soil ameliorantGround spread fertiliser and soil ameliorantAHC33416- Certificate III in Seed Production; AHC32616- Certificate III in Rural Machinery Operations; AHC31918- Certificate III in Rural Machinery Operations; AHC30116- Certificate III in Agriculture3This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to prepare and undertake activities required to ground spread fertiliser and soil ameliorants.
This unit applies to individuals who apply industry codes of practice and operating principles to ground spread fertiliser and soil ameliorants under broad direction, and take responsibility for their own work.
All work must be carried out to comply with workplace procedures, health and safety in the workplace requirements, legislative and regulatory requirements, manufacturer specifications, sustainability and biosecurity practices.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Identified hazards and implemented safe workplace practices and procedures; assessed environmental and physical hazards that may be encountered when undertaking ground spreading operations and taken appropriate action to minimise risks; communicated with clients to ensure a common understanding and agreement of task to be undertaken; used maps and interpreted written instructions regarding areas to be spread including types of products and application rates; maintained, calibrated and operated ground spreading equipment according to operation and maintenance manual, manufacturer specifications and in line with industry standards for uniformity of application; monitored weather conditions during ground spreading operations and adjusted operations to minimise risk to local environment and personnel in the vicinity; minimised environmental impacts associated with fertiliser and soil ameliorant application including attention to buffer zones and run-off; applied fertiliser or soil ameliorants at rate agreed by customer to specified land area, implemented shut down procedures including cleaning, securing, and safe storage of machinery; completed operational and equipment maintenance records according to workplace procedures; followed industry and workplace biosecurity procedures.Hazards and risks associated with fertiliser and soil ameliorant application, and machinery and equipment operation; fertiliser and soil ameliorant machinery and equipment operating components, controls, features, technical capabilities and limitations; operational limits of equipment with regard to uniformity of application and potential health and safety implications; spreading characteristics of different fertiliser and soil ameliorant products; environmental impacts associated with fertiliser spreading including hazards to waterways, purpose of buffer zones , methods of monitoring local weather conditions and the effects of changes on ground spreading activities; operating principles and operating methods of fertiliser and soil ameliorant machinery and equipment; procedures for cleaning, securing and storing fertiliser and soil ameliorant machinery, equipment and tools; workplace procedures applicable to fertiliser and soil ameliorant application; workplace procedures applicable to health and safety in the workplace and fertiliser and soil ameliorant application, and; fertiliser and soil ameliorant machinery and equipment, industry and workplace biosecurity procedures.Partial
AHCSAW302 - Implement erosion and sediment control measuresImplement erosion and sediment control measures NWP30219- Certificate III in Water Industry Operations; FWP30116- Certificate III in Forest Growing and Management; BSB42315- Certificate IV in Environmental Management and Sustainability; AHC33816- Certificate III in Permaculture; AHC32316- Certificate III in Conservation Earthworks; AHC31716- Certificate III in Natural Area Restoration; AHC31616- Certificate III in Lands, Parks and Wildlife; AHC31416- Certificate III in Conservation and Land Management3This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to construct, install and maintain a range of measures specified on erosion and sediment control plans.
This unit applies to individuals who work under broad direction and take responsibility for their own work including limited responsibility for the work of others.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Construct, install and maintain a range of erosion and sediment control measures; identify hazards and implement safe work procedures; prepare for implementation and construction; read and follow plans to carry out implementation and construction; identify survey pegs and site indicators on site and on the plans; carry out repairs and maintenance procedures to enterprise standards; select equipment and materials appropriate for the task; operate equipment and machinery according to safe work practices and manufacturer instructions; clean and store equipment, machinery and tools according to organisational requirements.Materials cartage pollution control; sequence of working and timing/duration; work health and safety issues relating to the equipment and the site; equipment used; materials suitable for constructing erosion and sediment control measures and where to source them on site; limitations of structures including timing of maintenance, structure life cycle, specifications and standards.Partial
AHCPER215 - Assist with garden soil health and plant nutritionAssist with garden soil health and plant nutritionAHC21716 - Certificate II in Permaculture2This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to assist with garden soil health and plant nutrition using simple methods and without costly equipment. It requires knowledge of simple soil testing techniques and how to improve soil health and plant nutrition organically. All work is carried out to comply with workplace procedures.
This unit applies to individuals who work under general supervision and exercise limited autonomy with some accountability for their own work. They undertake defined activities and work in a structured context.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Undertake simple soil assessment tests; add organic or allowable nutrients to improve soil; protect soil to maintain moisture and overall soil health.Permaculture principles and practices related to soil health and plant nutrition, such as: working with natural soils rather than importing soil, soil as an ecosystem, soil as biomass and carbon capture and storage; principles of sustainable horticultural practices; soil testing techniques, such as: (jar test for texture, ribbon test and ball test, pH testing, surface evaporation test, worm count); basic plant nutrition; allowable additives to improve soils, such as: compost and worm castings, compost teas, rock dust, gypsum, green manures, manures/animal bedding materials, leaf mould, plantings – green manures, nurse plants, companion planting, dynamic accumulators, chop and drop nutrient trapping systems, greywater use, organically certified products); methods of waste disposal causing minimal impact on the environment.Direct
AHCSOL202 - Assist with soil or growing media sampling and testingAssist with soil or growing media sampling and testingFBP20518- Certificate II in Wine Industry Operations; AHC31716- Certificate III in Natural Area Restoration; AHC31616- Certificate III in Lands, Parks and Wildlife; AHC31116- Certificate III in Production Nursery; AHC21819- Certificate II in Protected Horticulture; AHC21616- Certificate II in Landscaping; AHC21516- Certificate II in Floriculture; AHC21119- Certificate II in Irrigation; AHC21116- Certificate II in Irrigation; AHC21016- Certificate II in Conservation and Land Management; AHC20919- Certificate II in Sports Turf Management; AHC20916- Certificate II in Sports Turf Management; AHC20816- Certificate II in Retail Nursery; AHC20716- Certificate II in Production Nursery; AHC20616- Certificate II in Parks and Gardens; AHC20516- Certificate II in Arboriculture; AHC20416- Certificate II in Horticulture; AHC20316- Certificate II in Production Horticulture; AHC20116- Certificate II in Agriculture2This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to assist with the sampling and testing of soil or growing media sampling and testing.
This unit applies to individuals who work under general supervision and exercise limited autonomy with some accountability for their own work. They undertake defined activities and work in a structured context.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Collect soil and media samples; perform basic descriptive tests for soil texture, salinity and pH; describe soils or media using commonly used descriptive terms; assist with the use of simple soil testing equipment for testing pH and salinity; prepare records of soil sampling results as requiredPrinciples and practices for recognising soils or growing media properties; basic soil or media field tests; soil or media chemical properties; soil or media physical properties; soil or media plant relationships; soil sampling techniques.Direct
AHCSAW201 - Conduct erosion and sediment control activitiesConduct erosion and sediment control activities RII31215- Certificate III in Civil Foundations; RII30815- Certificate III in Civil Construction Plant Operations; RII30615- Certificate III in Small Mining Operations; RII20615- Certificate II in Mining / Field Exploration; RII20215- Certificate II in Surface Extraction Operations; FWP20116- Certificate II in Forest Growing and Management; AHC21016- Certificate II in Conservation and Land Management; AHC20116- Certificate II in Agriculture2This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to control erosion and sediment using earthworks construction and other land forming activities.
Construction is often carried out using a single earthmoving machine in varied conditions and terrains that requires the plant operator to develop skills that are unique to this sector.
This unit applies to individuals who work under general supervision and exercise limited autonomy with some accountability for their own work, they undertake defined routine activities.
No occupational licensing, legislative or certification requirements are known to apply to this unit at the time of publication.
Conduct erosion and sediment control activities as instructed by a supervisor; identify hazards and follow safe operating procedures; identify erosion and sediment control structures, measures and practices; carry out routine work with control measures and structures; identify areas at risk of erosion; operate or use machinery tools and equipment required for the tasks involved safely and efficientlyThe need for erosion and sediment control, including: the cost of erosion and sedimentation to the community, the effect of loss of habitat, how water quality is affected, how soil erosion can cause loss of production, assets and amenities, re-occurring maintenance, repair and monitoring requirements for controls, agents and processes of erosion and sedimentation and ways to control them, types of erosion and sediment control structures and techniques for constructing them, role of vegetation in erosion control, basic catchment issues, characteristics of soils with an emphasis on erodible soils.Indirect